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ASRC 1100 : Elementary Swahili I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Provides an introduction to the Swahili language and culture. In this course, students engage in short conversations and communicative tasks in interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational modes on diverse topics such as family, communication and interactions, daily routines, shopping, asking for and giving directions, food, transportation, mood expressions and cultural sensitivity, etc. Students are also given tasks to help them develop knowledge of cultural aspects and language situations that are likely to be encountered in daily life interactions while in any Swahili speaking country. No prior knowledge of the language is required. Literature and cultural competence materials are incorporated into the course, along with audio-visual and web-based materials. By the end of this course students should be able at to reach proficiency level Novice Mid According to the American Council of on the Teaching of Foreign Language (ACTFL) www.actfl.org
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ASRC 1108 : Introduction to Yoruba I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
A two-semester beginner's course in Yoruba Language and Culture. Organized to offer Yoruba language skills and proficiency in speaking, reading, listening, writing, and translation. Focus is placed on familiar informal and formal contexts, e.g., home, school, work, family, social situations, politics, etc. Course uses Yoruba oral literature, proverbs, rhetoric, songs, popular videos, and theater, as learning tools for class comprehension. First semester focuses on conversation, speaking, and listening.  Second semester focuses on writing, translation and grammatical formation. Through the language course students gain basic background for the study of an African culture, arts, and history both in the continent and in the diaspora. Yoruba language is widely spoken along the west coast of Africa and in some African communities in diaspora.  Yoruba video culture, theater, music, and arts has a strong influence along the west coast and in the diaspora.A two-semester beginner's course in Yoruba Language and Culture. Organized to offer Yoruba language skills and proficiency in speaking, reading, listening, writing, and translation. Focus is placed on familiar informal and formal contexts, e.g., home, school, work, family, social situations, politics, etc. Course uses Yoruba oral literature, proverbs, rhetoric, songs, popular videos, and theater, as learning tools for class comprehension. First semester focuses on conversation, speaking, and listening.  Second semester focuses on writing, translation and grammatical formation. Through the language course students gain basic background for the study of an African culture, arts, and history both in the continent and in the diaspora. Yoruba language is widely spoken along the west coast of Africa and in some African communities in diaspora.  Yoruba video culture, theater, music, and arts has a strong influence along the west coast and in the diaspora.
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ASRC 1113 : Elementary Zulu I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
IsiZulu is the most widely spoken language in the Southern African region and it is an official language of South Africa. This two-semester beginners' course emphasizes speaking and listening, and trains students to communicate in everyday situations.  In acquiring this competence, students are introduced to the structure of the language and to the significant status of Zulu language and culture in contemporary multilingual South Africa.  The course is structured around IsiZulu Sanamuhla, a set of web-based learning materials that features Zulu-speaking students and families in South Africa.
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ASRC 1117 : Elementary Wolof I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Wolof is an African language. It is widely spoken in West Africa in countries such as Senegal, The Gambia and Mauritania. Wolof is the most widely spoken language in Senegal.  There are strong historical and contemporary links between the African American experiences and West Africa. Senegal and Wolof are important links in these experiences.   Wolof has some influence on some West European languages. Banana is a Wolof word and it is also an English word! Study Wolof, Know Africa and Know the world!This course is taught via videoconference from Columbia University. Wolof is an African language. It is widely spoken in West Africa in countries such as Senegal, The Gambia and Mauritania. Wolof is the most widely spoken language in Senegal.  There are strong historical and contemporary links between the African American experiences and West Africa. Senegal and Wolof are important links in these experiences.   Wolof has some influence on some West European languages. Banana is a Wolof word and it is also an English word! Study Wolof, Know Africa and Know the world!
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ASRC 1201 : Elementary Arabic I
Crosslisted as: NES 1201, NES 1201, NES 1201, NES 1201, NES 1201, NES 1201 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This two-course sequence assumes no previous knowledge of Arabic and provides a thorough grounding in the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It starts with the alphabet and the number system and builds the four skills gradually and systematically through carefully selected and organized materials focusing on specific, concrete and familiar topics such as self identification, family, travel, food, renting an apartment, study, the weather, etc.). These topics are listed in the textbook's table of contents.  The student who successfully completes the two-course sequence will have mastered about 1000 basic words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations on a limited range of practical topics such as self-identification, family, school, work, the weather, travel, etc., 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 180 words written in Arabic script, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 50-word paragraph in Arabic.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Novice to the Intermediate Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
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ASRC 1203 : Intermediate Arabic I
Crosslisted as: NES 1203 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
In this two-course sequence learners continue to develop the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing and grammar foundation through the extensive use of graded materials on a wide variety of topics.  While more attention is given to developing native-like pronunciation and to grammatical accuracy than in NES 1201 and NES 1202, the main focus of the course will be on encouraging fluency and facility in understanding the language and communicating ideas in it.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence will have mastered over 1500 new words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations related to a wide variety of topics beyond those covered in NES 1201 and NES 1202, such as the history and geography of the Arab world, food and health, sports, economic matters, the environment, politics, the Palestine problem, etc. 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 300 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 150-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in NES 1202.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Intermediate Mid to the Advanced Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
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ASRC 1500 : Introduction to Africana Studies
Crosslisted as: AMST 1500, GOVT 1503 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course offers an introduction to the study of Africa, the U.S., the Caribbean and other diasporas.  This course will examine, through a range of disciplines, among them literature, history, politics, philosophy, the themes - including race/racism, the Middle Passage, sexuality, colonialism, and culture - that have dominated Africana Studies since its inception in the late-1960s. We will explore these issues in the attempt to understand how black lives have been shaped, in a historical sense; and, of course, the effects of these issues in the contemporary moment. This course seeks to introduce these themes, to investigate through one or more of the disciplines relevant to the question, and to provide a broad understanding of the themes so as to enable the kind of intellectual reflection critical to Africana Studies.
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ASRC 1996 : The Underground Railroad Seminar
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This seminar and its accompanying immersion offer undergraduates the unique opportunity to explore the abolition movement of upstate New York. This course provides an introductory examination of antebellum slavery and its abolition in the United States, including slave resistance, emancipation, reconstruction and effects of U.S. slavery on current social contexts. Students will also explore modern day slavery, forced labor, and contemporary abolition/resistance movements. Course participants will create a curriculum to be proposed to the Ithaca City School District for future undergraduate students to teach and learn with local youth about the area's Underground Railroad and community advocacy and activism. The weekend immersion trips offer an experiential learning opportunity as participants retrace routes of the local Underground Railroad and abolition movement through several cities in upstate New York and Southern Ontario, Canada. This seminar and corresponding travel are offered by Cornell's Office of Academic Diversity Initiatives, Engaged Learning & Research and Public Service Center.
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ASRC 2101 : Intermediate Swahili I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Intermediate Swahili levels I and II in general impart speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills beyond Swahili elementary level to participate with ease and confidence in familiar topics and exchange information on unfamiliar topics. Students are assigned communicative tasks such as respond to a situation with a short text and take part in a discussion after viewing short video clips and prompts to elicit speaking and listening competence and cultural awareness responses beyond elementary level. The language and cultural scenarios practiced are designed to help students demonstrate language responses beyond familiar topics, and to feel comfortable conversing with Swahili native speakers, as well as to blend in and feel welcomed as part of the community while exploring different topics such as acquaintanceship, relationships, health, festivals, education, sports, housing, politics, commerce, travel, etc. Short stories are used to depict cultural aspects such as cultural expressions, proverbs, sayings, and riddles. Literature and cultural materials are incorporated into the course, along with audio-visual and web-based material. In this course, students have an opportunity to participate in language conversation outside the classroom and explore the opportunities for study abroad in East Africa. Swahili Elementary I and II are prerequisite for this course. By the end of this course, students should be able to reach proficiency level Intermediate High according to the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) www.actfl.org.
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ASRC 2110 : Intermediate Yoruba I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The intermediate course extends the development of the main language skills-reading, writing, listening, and conversation. The course deepens the development of correct native pronunciation, the accuracy of grammatical and syntactic structures; and the idiomatic nuances of the language. Students who take the course are able to (1) prepare, illustrate, and present Yoruba texts such as poems, folktales, advertisements, compositions, letters, (2) read Yoruba literature of average complexity, (3) interpret Yoruba visual texts of average difficulty, (4) comprehend Yoruba oral literature and philosophy-within the context of African oral literature and philosophy-of basic complexity. Through the Yoruba language students appreciate African oral literature and philosophy. The primary textual media are Yoruba short stories, poems, short plays, films, songs, and newspapers.
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ASRC 2116 : Intermediate Zulu I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The course is structured around IsiZulu Sanamuhla, a set of web-based learning materials that features Zulu-speaking students and families in South Africa.
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ASRC 2118 : Intermediate Wolof I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Wolof is an African language. It is widely spoken in West Africa in countries such as Senegal, The Gambia, and Mauritania.
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ASRC 2160 : The Black Family and the Socialization of Black Children
Crosslisted as: HD 2710 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Prepare to be challenged in this course exploring the historic and contemporary dynamics of the African American family in U.S. society. From the African Diaspora to the Cosby Show, we will focus on the socio-historical, -political and - cultural contexts of black family formations and functions--both real and invented. We'll study Afrocentric, feminist, and sociological frameworks for understanding black families. We'll examine the continuation of African heritage in black family organization. We'll tackle hard issues of gender roles, sexuality, love, mate selection, divorce, marriage dissolution, parenting, fatherhood and the well- being of black children. And we'll look at popular culture, paying special attention to how black families are imagined and re- imagined in the news, on television, in film and through music.
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ASRC 2212 : Caribbean Worlds
Crosslisted as: ENGL 2512, LSP 2212 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ASRC 2308 : Modern Caribbean History
Crosslisted as: HIST 2541, LATA 2308 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines the development of the Caribbean since the Haitian Revolution.  It  will focus on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and our readings pay particular attention to the ways in which race, gender, and ethnicity shape the histories of the peoples of the region.  The course uses a pan-Caribbean approach by focusing largely on three islands - Jamaica, Haiti and Cuba - that belonged to competing empires.  Although the imperial powers that held these nations shaped their histories in distinctive ways these nations share certain common features. Therefore, we examine the differences and similarities of their histories as they evolved from plantation based colonies to independent nations. 
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ASRC 2674 : History of the Modern Middle East
Crosslisted as: GOVT 2747, HIST 2674, NES 2674 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines major trends in the evolution of the Middle East in the modern era. Focusing on the 19th and 20th centuries and ending with the  "Arab Spring," we will consider Middle East history with an emphasis on five themes: imperialism, nationalism, modernization, Islam, and revolution.  Readings will be supplemented with translated primary sources, which will form the backbone of class discussions.
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ASRC 2770 : Representing Racial Encounters/Encountering Racial Representations
Crosslisted as: AMST 2770, ENGL 2770, LSP 2770 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This team-taught course uses literature and popular culture, alongside literary, social, and cultural theory to consider how people from different cultures encounter and experience each other. The course explores travel from multiple perspectives, the concept of dark tourism, and the cultural industry of racial representation. Designed for the general student population, the course specifically appeals to students traveling abroad, or who in the future will work with diverse communities (for example, students with interests in medicine, law, labor, government, business, the hospitality industry, or in the fields of gender, queer, or ethnic studies). The course serves as an introduction to the critical inquiries and scholarly fields of the English department.
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ASRC 3031 : Race and Revolution in the Americas: 1776-1900
Crosslisted as: AMST 3032, HIST 3031, LATA 3031 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course will examine the "age of democratic revolutions" in the Americas from the perspective of the Black Atlantic. During this momentous era, when European monarchies were successfully challenged and constitutional governments created, Blacks fomented their own American revolutions both in the outside of evolving "New World democracies." This course examines the black trajectory in British North America, Latin America, the French (especially Haiti,) the British and the Spanish Caribbean. The course begins with black participation in the U.S. independence War (1776-1781) and concludes with black (non-U.S.) participation in the independence wars against Spain. The course will also briefly address post-emancipation race relations in these American countries.
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ASRC 3100 : Advanced Arabic I
Crosslisted as: NES 3201 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
In this two-semester sequence, learners will be introduced to authentic, unedited Arabic language materials ranging from short stories, and poems, to newspaper articles dealing with social,  political,  and cultural issues. Emphasis will be on developing fluency in oral expression through discussions of issues presented in the reading and listening selections. There will be more focus on the development of native-like pronunciation and accurate use of grammatical structures than in the previous four courses. A primary objective of the course is the development of the writing skill through free composition exercises in topics of interest to individual students.  This course starts where NES 2200 leaves off and continues the development of the four language skills and grammar foundation using 18 themes, some new and some introduced in previous courses but are presented here at a more challenging level.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence have mastered over 3000 new words and will be able, within context of the 18 new and recycled themes to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations, 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, authentic, unedited passages of up to 400 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 300-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in NES 2200.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Advanced Mid to the Superior level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
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ASRC 3110 : Advanced Yoruba I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course will help students expand their understanding of the Yoruba language through the communicative approach. We will focus on the four skills, speaking, listening, learning, and writing.
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ASRC 3113 : Advanced Zulu I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The course is structured around IsiZulu Sanamuhla, a set of web-based learning materials that features Zulu-speaking students and families in South Africa.
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ASRC 3340 : Race, Class, Gender and Violence
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3340 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ASRC 3350 : Beyoncé Nation
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3950, FGSS 3550 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ASRC 3470 : Nueva York:Caribbean Urbanisms
Crosslisted as: AMST 3475, LATA 3470, LSP 3470, SPAN 3470 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ASRC 3501 : African Art and Culture
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3510 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ASRC 3511 : Hip Hop: Conflict and Controversy
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
In this debate-format exploration of the most polarizing topics in hip hop, we'll examine the intersection of urban culture and American values. Does hip hop glorify violence, or simply reflect the reality of urban poverty? Should society censor homophobic and sexist music? Who should be allowed to use the n-word? Is hip hop dead, or has there been a renaissance of creativity in recent years? We'll examine the toughest questions facing hip hop as a way to discuss significant social issues related to race, social class, sexuality, and gender. Classes will feature guest faculty from other universities, hip hop artists, and members of the Ithaca community.
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ASRC 3652 : African Economic Development Histories
Crosslisted as: HIST 3652 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
What impact did Africa's involvement in the slave trade and its colonization by Europe have on its long-term economic health? What role have post-independence political decisions made within Africa and by multinational economic actors (the World Bank and the IMF, for example) had on altering the trajectory of Africa's economic history? Does China's recent heavy investment in Africa portend a movement away from or a continuation of Africa's economic underdevelopment? These questions and others will be addressed in this course.
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ASRC 4212 : Black Women's Autobiography in the 21st Century WritingHerStory
Crosslisted as: AMST 4212, ENGL 4912, FGSS 4212 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ASRC 4393 : The Underground Railroad and the Coming of the Civil War
Crosslisted as: AMST 4393, HIST 4393, HIST 6393 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
In 1850 American politicians banded together cross-regionally, passed a Fugitive Slave Law and breathed a sigh of relief, thinking they had once again dodged the slavery issue that threatened disunion. This "Bloodhound Bill" was designed to make "slave" catchers of all Northern whites. Instead it set in motion waves of protests, transformed previously silent whites into underground conductors, further emboldened veteran underground workers and forced thousands of self emancipated Northern blacks to emigrate. The Underground Railroad contributed to convincing Southerners that the Government would not or could not protect slavery. This course examines underground activism beginning in 1850 and offers an interpretation of how the Underground Railroad led to emancipation. The ebbs and flows of underground activity; transnational networks; Civil War military and geo-political issues; and what W.E.B. DuBois called the "General Strike" all contributed to making the Thirteenth Amendment a foregone conclusion.
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ASRC 4514 : Post Colonial Studies and Black Radical Imagination
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4514, ARTH 6514, ASRC 6514 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ASRC 4606 : The Family and Society in Africa and the African Diaspora
Crosslisted as: SOC 4780 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ASRC 4650 : Contesting Identities in Modern Egypt
Crosslisted as: HIST 4091, NES 4605 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This seminar examines the dynamics of modern collective identities which dominated the Egyptian public sphere in the long twentieth century. We will explore the underpinnings and formation of territorial Egyptian nationalism, pan-Arabism and Islamism through close readings and class discussions of important theoretical, historiographical and primary texts.
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ASRC 4900 : Honors Thesis
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
For senior Africana Studies majors working on honors theses, with selected reading, research projects, etc., under the supervision of a member of the Africana Studies and Research Center faculty.
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ASRC 4902 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
For students working on special topics, with selected reading, research projects, etc., under the supervision of a member of the Africana Studies and Research Center faculty.
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ASRC 6514 : Post Colonial Studies and Black Radical Imagination
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4514, ARTH 6514, ASRC 4514 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ASRC 6900 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Independent study course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ASRC 6902 : Africana Studies Graduate Seminar
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course is the first in a two-part course sequence offered in the fall and spring semesters annually. (PALABER: HAVE A SEAT; HEAR ME OUT)
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ASRC 6941 : Twenty-First Century African American Literature
Crosslisted as: ENGL 6941 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description