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SWAHL 1101 : Elementary Swahili II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Elementary Swahili provides a foundation in listening, speaking, reading, and writing the basic grammatical structures and vocabulary. No prior knowledge of the language is required. Swahili (Kiswahili) is spoken in the East and Central parts of Africa. It is an official and national language in Tanzania, and in Kenya. During a first semester course, students engage in short conversation and communicative tasks, such as, greetings, introduction, daily routines, shopping, etc. Students learn to comprehend short and simple utterances about topics pertaining to basic personal information and immediate setting in day to day life. A Swahili second semester increases your oral fluency, grammar, vocabulary, writing, reading, and listening skills. All listening exercises will aim at preparing students to speak. Be ready to actively participate in conversations, to express yourself orally, and write stories/compositions. Literature and Cultural materials are incorporated into the course, along with audio, video, and web-based materials.
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ASRC 1105 : Elementary Swahili Study Abroad
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor: Description
SWAHL 1107 : Elementary Swahili for Global Health
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course is intended for students whom will be spending the summer in Tanzania for the Global Health Program.  To prepare students to live and learn in Tanzania, this course will provide an introduction to and foundation in basic Kiswahili.  Students will develop the capacity to communicate with Tanzanian peers and homestay families, as well as develop the competency to navigate community life in Tanzania. Since this is a one credit seminar, this course does NOT fulfill a language requirement for colleges or majors.This course is intended for students whom will be spending the summer in Tanzania for the Global Health Program.  To prepare students to live and learn in Tanzania, this course will provide an introduction to and foundation in basic Kiswahili.  Students will develop the capacity to communicate with Tanzanian peers and homestay families, as well as develop the competency to navigate community life in Tanzania. Since this is a one credit seminar, this course does NOT fulfill a language requirement for colleges or majors.
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YORUB 1109 : Introduction to Yoruba II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
A two-semester beginner's course in Yoruba Language and Culture. Organized to offer Yoruba language skills and proficiency in speaking, reading, listening, writing, and translation. Focus is placed on familiar informal and formal contexts, e.g., home, school, work, family, social situations, politics, etc. Course uses Yoruba oral literature, proverbs, rhetoric, songs, popular videos, and theater, as learning tools for class comprehension. First semester focuses on conversation, speaking, and listening.  Second semester focuses on writing, translation and grammatical formation. Through the language course students gain basic background for the study of an African culture, arts, and history both in the continent and in the diaspora. Yoruba language is widely spoken along the west coast of Africa and in some African communities in diaspora.  Yoruba video culture, theater, music, and arts has a strong influence along the west coast and in the diaspora.A two-semester beginner's course in Yoruba language and culture. Organized to offer Yoruba language skills and proficiency in speaking, reading, listening, writing, and translation. Focus is placed on familiar informal and formal contexts, e.g., home, school, work, family, social situations, politics. Course uses Yoruba oral literature, proverbs, rhetoric, songs, popular videos, and theater as learning tools for class comprehension. First semester focuses on conversation, speaking, and listening. Second semester focuses on writing, translation, and grammatical formation. Through the language course students gain basic background for the study of an African culture, arts, and history both on the continent and in the diaspora. Yoruba language is widely spoken along the west coast of Africa and in some African communities in diaspora. Yoruba video culture, theater, music, and arts have strong influence along the west coast and in the diaspora.
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ZULU 1116 : Elementary Zulu II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
IsiZulu is the most widely spoken language in the Southern African region and it is an official language of South Africa. This two-semester beginners' course emphasizes speaking and listening, and trains students to communicate in everyday situations.  In acquiring this competence, students are introduced to the structure of the language and to the significant status of Zulu language and culture in contemporary multilingual South Africa.  The course is structured around IsiZulu Sanamuhla, a set of web-based learning materials that features Zulu-speaking students and families in South Africa.IsiZulu is the most widely spoken language in the Southern African region and it is an official language of South Africa. This two-semester beginners' course emphasizes speaking and listening, and trains students to communicate in everyday situations.  In acquiring this competence, students are introduced to the structure of the language and to the significant status of Zulu language and culture in contemporary multilingual South Africa.  The course is structured around IsiZulu Sanamuhla, a set of web-based learning materials that features Zulu-speaking students and families in South Africa.
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WOLOF 1118 : Elementary Wolof II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Wolof is an African language. It is widely spoken in West Africa in countries such as Senegal, The Gambia and Mauritania. Wolof is the most widely spoken language in Senegal.  There are strong historical and contemporary links between the African American experiences and West Africa. Senegal and Wolof are important links in these experiences. Wolof has some influence on some West European languages. Banana is a Wolof word and it is also an English word! Study Wolof, Know Africa and Know the world! Wolof is an African language. It is widely spoken in West Africa in countries such as Senegal, The Gambia and Mauritania. Wolof is the most widely spoken language in Senegal.  There are strong historical and contemporary links between the African American experiences and West Africa. Senegal and Wolof are important links in these experiences.   Wolof has some influence on some West European languages. Banana is a Wolof word and it is also an English word! Study Wolof, Know Africa and Know the world!
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ASRC 1202 : Elementary Arabic II
Crosslisted as: ARAB 1202, ARAB 1202, ARAB 1202, ARAB 1202 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This two-course sequence assumes no previous knowledge of Arabic and provides a thorough grounding in the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It starts with the alphabet and the number system and builds the four skills gradually and systematically through carefully selected and organized materials focusing on specific, concrete and familiar topics such as self identification, family, travel, food, renting an apartment, study, the weather, etc.). These topics are listed in the textbook's table of contents.  The student who successfully completes the two-course sequence will have mastered about 1000 basic words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations on a limited range of practical topics such as self-identification, family, school, work, the weather, travel, etc., 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 180 words written in Arabic script, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 50-word paragraph in Arabic.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Novice to the Intermediate Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
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ASRC 1844 : FWS: Whites Are Here to Stay
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
At the conclusion of World War II, the US ushered in a new international order based on the principles of the Atlantic Charter, which became the basis for the United Nations Charter: including but not limited to the right to self-determination and global economic cooperation. All this changed when Henry Kissinger proclaimed that "The whites are (in Africa) to stay and the only way that constructive change can come about is through them. There is no hope for the blacks to gain the political rights they seek through violence, which will only lead to chaos and increased opportunities for the communists." This course examine how US Foreign policy toward Africa has been formulated and executed since the Nixon years.
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ASRC 1900 : Research Strategies in Africana and Latino Studies
Crosslisted as: LSP 1101, LSP 1101 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The digital revolution has made an enormous amount of information available to research scholars, but discovering resources and using them effectively can be challenging. This course introduces students with research interests in Latino and Africana Studies to search strategies and methods for finding materials in various formats (e.g., digital, film, and print) using information databases such as the library catalog, print and electronic indexes, and the World Wide Web. Instructors provide equal time for lecture and hands-on learning. Topics include government documents, statistics, subject-specific online databases, social sciences, the humanities, and electronic citation management.
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ASRC 1996 : The Underground Railroad Seminar
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This seminar and its accompanying immersion offer undergraduates the unique opportunity to explore the abolition movement of upstate New York. This course provides an introductory examination of antebellum slavery and its abolition in the United States, including slave resistance, emancipation, reconstruction and effects of U.S. slavery on current social contexts. Students will also explore modern day slavery, forced labor, and contemporary abolition/resistance movements. Course participants will create a curriculum to be proposed to the Ithaca City School District for future undergraduate students to teach and learn with local youth about the area's Underground Railroad and community advocacy and activism. The weekend immersion trips offer an experiential learning opportunity as participants retrace routes of the local Underground Railroad and abolition movement through several cities in upstate New York and Southern Ontario, Canada. This seminar and corresponding travel are offered by Cornell's Office of Academic Diversity Initiatives, Engaged Learning & Research and Public Service Center.
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SWAHL 2102 : Intermediate Swahili II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Intermediate Swahili levels I and II in general impart speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills beyond Swahili elementary level to participate with ease and confidence in familiar topics and exchange information on unfamiliar topics. Students are assigned communicative tasks such as respond to a situation with a short text and take part in a discussion after viewing short video clips and prompts to elicit speaking and listening competence and cultural awareness responses beyond elementary level. The language and cultural scenarios practiced are designed to help students demonstrate language responses beyond familiar topics, and to feel comfortable conversing with Swahili native speakers, as well as to blend in and feel welcomed as part of the community while exploring different topics such as acquaintanceship, relationships, health, festivals, education, sports, housing, politics, commerce, travel, etc. Short stories are used to depict cultural aspects such as cultural expressions, proverbs, sayings, and riddles. Literature and cultural materials are incorporated into the course, along with audio-visual and web-based material. In this course, students have an opportunity to participate in language conversation outside the classroom and explore the opportunities for study abroad in East Africa. Swahili Elementary I and II are prerequisite for this course. By the end of this course, students should be able to reach proficiency level Intermediate High according to the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) www.actfl.org.
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YORUB 2111 : Intermediate Yoruba II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Intermediate Yoruba II is a follow-up to Intermediate Yoruba I. It is a fourth-semester Yoruba language course. The course assists students to acquire advanced level proficiency in reading, speaking, writing, and listening in Yoruba language. Students are introduced to grammatical and syntactic structures in the language that will assist them in describing, presenting, and narrating information in the basic tenses. At the end of the course, students will be able to listen to, process, and understand programs produced for native speakers in media such as television, radio, and films. They will be able to read and understand short stories, novels, and plays written for native speakers of the language.
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ASRC 2112 : Black Spirituality, Religion & Protest
Crosslisted as: AMST 2112, HIST 2112, RELST 2112 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines Black spirituality, religion, and protest from an historical perspective, beginning with African traditions and Christianity during enslavement, which created resistance ideology and racial nationalism. Prophetic Christianity and church formation became primary political weapons after enslavement, particularly in the Age of Jim Crow, and foundationally led to twentieth century civil rights movements. While exploring these themes, the course will also analyze the complexities and contractions (i.e. Southern Baptist Convention, Nation of Islam and Black Lives Matter) inherent in resistance movements based on spiritual leadership.
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ZULU 2117 : Intermediate Zulu II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The course is structured around IsiZulu Sanamuhla, a set of web-based learning materials that features Zulu-speaking students and families in South Africa.
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WOLOF 2119 : Intermediate Wolof II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The course is structured around IsiZulu Sanamuhla, a set of web-based learning materials that features Zulu-speaking students and families in South Africa.
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ASRC 2200 : Intermediate Arabic II
Crosslisted as: ARAB 2202, ARAB 2202 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this two-course sequence learners continue to develop the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing and grammar foundation through the extensive use of graded materials on a wide variety of topics.  While more attention is given to developing native-like pronunciation and to grammatical accuracy than in ARAB 1201 and ARAB 1202, the main focus of the course will be on encouraging fluency and facility in understanding the language and communicating ideas in it.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence will have mastered over 1500 new words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations related to a wide variety of topics beyond those covered in ARAB 1201 and ARAB 1202, such as the history and geography of the Arab world, food and health, sports, economic matters, the environment, politics, the Palestine problem, etc. 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 300 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 150-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in ARAB 1202.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Intermediate Mid to the Advanced Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
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ASRC 2204 : Introduction to Quranic Arabic
Crosslisted as: ARAB 2204, RELST 2204 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course is designed for students who are interested in reading the language of the Qur'an with accuracy and understanding. The first week (4 classes) will be devoted to an introduction of the history of the Qur'an: the revelation, collection, variant readings, and establishment of an authoritative edition. The last week will be devoted to a general overview of "revisionist" literature on the Qur'an. In the remaining 12 weeks, we will cover all of Part 30 (Juz' 'Amma, suuras 78-114) and three suuras of varying length (36, 19, and 12).
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ASRC 2240 : Perspectives on the Caribbean
Crosslisted as: LATA 2240, SPAN 2240 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines the Caribbean as a site where challenges to and within Western thought emerged. We analyze the ways in which freedom is described in revolutionary thinking by interrogating the following themes in four sections. In the first section, we analyze the difficulties that 16th-century theologians experienced in determining if the "Indian" possessed a soul and if the Spanish crown could wage a "just war" against indigenous "pagans": this debate was crucial for the New World origins of disciples such as anthropology and international relations. In the second section, we examine the Haitian Revolution in order to describe and interrogate the philosophical and historical relations between master and slave. In the third section, we look at writings such as the Communist manifesto and Che Guevara' essays in order to analyze the difficulties of articulating the relationship between man and socialism in Cuba. In the final section, we examine the problems of designating who constitutes the native "we" and the foreign "them" in the neoliberal economic revolution that is taking place in Jamaica; for this discussion, we will read Jamaica Kincaid's A Small Place and view Stephanie Black's film, Life and Debt.
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ASRC 2351 : Intro to Africa and its Diaspora
Crosslisted as: FGSS 2351 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course introduces students to the study of Africa and its Diasporas, including the Americas and West Indies, as well as Europe.  The course takes a multimedia, interdisciplinary approach to a range of historical, literary, artistic, religious, economic, and political questions crucial to the understanding of the experiences of people of African descent.  Using maps, films, the visual arts, music, important historical and contemporary texts, and short stories, the course will focus on four major themes: 1) migration and the middle passage; 2) slavery and resistance; 3) segregation, colonialism and freedom movements; and 4) the arts and global Black consciousness.
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ASRC 2380 : Performing Hip Hop
Crosslisted as: MUSIC 2380 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course is a hybrid seminar/performance forum that combines scholarly exploration of hip hop musical aesthetics with applied performance. Students will engage in online and in-class discussions of hip hop musical aesthetics, contextualized historically, socially, and culturally through weekly reading and listening assignments.  They will also devote significant time to creating and workshopping individual and collaborative musical projects. Formal musical training is not required, but students should have experience making music (instrumentalists, beat makers, lyricists, vocalists, beatboxers, etc.), and should have at least a basic familiarity with hip hop music. Students who wish to enroll in the course should contact the professor for more information. 
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ASRC 2452 : Dress Cloth and Identity
Crosslisted as: HIST 2452 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course uses a multi-disciplinary approach to examine the importance of textiles in African social and economic history. It combines art history, anthropology, social and economic history to explore the role of textiles in marking status, gender, political authority and ethnicity. In addition, we examine the production and distribution of indigenous cloth and the consequences of colonial rule on African textile industries. Our analysis also considers the principles of African dress and clothing that shaped the African diaspora in the Americas as well as the more recent popularity and use of African fabrics and dress in the United States.
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ASRC 2504 : Obama and the Meaning of Race
Crosslisted as: AMST 2504, GOVT 2604, SOC 2520 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The election of Barack Obama to the presidency has raised new questions in the American debate on race, politics, and social science. Has America entered a post-racial society in which racism and inequality are things of the past? Or does Obama's post-Black, race-neutral approach to governing signal the end of Black politics, race-based activism and prescriptive policy? In this course, students will use the Obama presidency to think, talk, and write about how race works in America. We'll examine the symbolism of Obama's personal narrative and biracialism to analyze his race-neutral campaigns and governing within the context of history, politics, and policies. We'll look at the public image of Michelle Obama, especially how she is gendered as Black radical and fashionista.
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ASRC 2512 : Black Women in the 20th Century
Crosslisted as: AMST 2512, FGSS 2512, HIST 2512 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course focuses on African American women in the 20th century. The experiences of black women will be examined from a social, practical, communal, and gendered perspective. Topics include the Club Woman's movement, suffrage, work, family, black and white women and feminism, black women and radicalism, and the feminization of poverty.
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ASRC 2542 : The Making of Contemporary Africa
Crosslisted as: HIST 2542 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Most people learn about Africa through the media.  However, media critics note that coverage is disproportionately skewed toward negative stories - poverty, war and corruption. While these factors are a reality for too many people on the continent, media observers note that too often the coverage lacks context and breadth.  Furthermore, media outlets do not report positive developments even where they exist.  This course will provide some of the depth and context necessary to understand events in contemporary Africa.  The first two-thirds of the course will examine African social and economic history since the nineteenth century - Africa's integration in the international economy, the rise of new social classes, the creation of the colonial state and the post-colonial state.  Our primary examples will be drawn from  East, West and Southern Africa to highlight both the similarities and differences of their historical development.  The final third of the course will examine several contemporary issues in which scholars and journalists have attempted to address the weaknesses in general press coverage. 
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ASRC 3010 : Sweetness: How Sugar Built the Modern World
Crosslisted as: LATA 3015 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Rice, wheat, and maize are examples of crops that sustained the civilizations in which they were cultivated for centuries. Sugar is different. Not only is sugar cane a relatively recent transplant, originating in Melanesia and South Asia, taken to the Middle East, and then cultivated extensively in the tropical regions of plantation America beginning in the 17th century. The sugar that it produces began as a luxury commodity and gradually became a household staple over the course of three centuries. This course examines key aspects of the transformation of sugar cane from plant to luxury commodity and then to staple, with particular emphasis on the impact that its cultivation and manufacturing had on the ecology, demography, diet, history, culture, economies, and politics of the Caribbean Basin. Sugar manufacturing in this region generated the enormous wealth that slave and indentured labor produced in and for transatlantic commerce for the three centuries that gave rise to the modern, western world. Given the importance of sugar at the time, sugar plantations were sites of some of the most ambitious experiments in science, industry, labor, and trade that the world had ever seen.
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ASRC 3101 : Advanced Arabic II
Crosslisted as: ARAB 3202 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this two-semester sequence, learners will be introduced to authentic, unedited Arabic language materials ranging from short stories, and poems, to newspaper articles dealing with social,  political,  and cultural issues. Emphasis will be on developing fluency in oral expression through discussions of issues presented in the reading and listening selections. There will be more focus on the development of native-like pronunciation and accurate use of grammatical structures than in the previous four courses. A primary objective of the course is the development of the writing skill through free composition exercises in topics of interest to individual students.  This course starts where ARAB 2202 leaves off and continues the development of the four language skills and grammar foundation using 18 themes, some new and some introduced in previous courses but are presented here at a more challenging level.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence have mastered over 3000 new words and will be able, within context of the 18 new and recycled themes to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations, 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, authentic, unedited passages of up to 400 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 300-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in ARAB 2202.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Advanced Mid to the Superior level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
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YORUB 3111 : Advanced Yoruba II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will help students expand their understanding of the Yoruba language through the communicative approach. We will focus on the four skills, speaking, listening, learning, and writing.
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ZULU 3114 : Advanced Zulu II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The course is structured around IsiZulu Sanamuhla, a set of web-based learning materials that features Zulu-speaking students and families in South Africa.
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YORUB 3120 : Yoruba Foreign Language Across the Curriculum (FLAC)
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This 1-credit optional course aims to expand the students' vocabulary, and advance their speaking and reading skills as well as enhance their knowledge and deepen their cultural understanding by supplementing non-language courses throughout the University.
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ASRC 3420 : The Trans-Sahara Anti-Terrorist Campaign: Chasing AQMI, Al-Qaeda, and ISIS in an African Desert
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3423, NES 3920 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Since the events of September 11, 2001, the war on terrorism has been the focus of US foreign policy in Africa. This focus has led to major adjustments in US priorities in Africa, including the pairing of diplomacy, defense, and development into new forms of cooperation and intervention. One of the framework for the new approach is the Trans Sahara Counter Terrorism Partnership (TSCTP) under which the US has associated ten African countries in its global fight against terrorism. The TSCTP is predicated on the idea that significant areas of Africa, peopled as they are by weak states, could become a safe haven for terrorist groups linked with al-Qaeda, the Salafists, and other radical Islamic groups including ISIL today. This course explores the operations of the TSCTP and points of friction between the US and the populations of the zone of implementation. We will place special emphasis on African suspicions of some key tenets of the war on terrorism and skepticism of the methods adopted in the war on terrorism. Key among these are the principle of securing the primary of counterterrorism and the necessary institutional frictions that arise when considering development and good governance.
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ASRC 3550 : Modeling Race, Fashioning Beauty
Crosslisted as: AMST 3560, FGSS 3540 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores written and visual biographies of African American and African women in the fashion industry as a launching point for thinking about beauty, race, gender and class. Some of the questions that will be explored during the semester are: How do ethnicity and femininity intersect? How are authenticity and difference commodified? How do women construct identities through narrative or craft themselves through body modification? How do women negotiate their relationships to their bodies, families and nations? Contemporary television programs, global fashion and cultural studies will also be discussed. Students will write self-narratives about their relationships with cultural standards of beauty.
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ASRC 3590 : The Black Radical Tradition in the U.S.
Crosslisted as: AMST 3590, HIST 3590 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course provides a critical historical interrogation of what Black Marxism author Cedric Robinson called "the Black Radical Tradition." It will introduce students to some of the major currents in the history of black radical thought, action, and organizing, with an emphasis on the United States after World War I. It relies on social, political, and intellectual history to examine the efforts of black people who have sought not merely social reform, but a fundamental restructuring of political, economic, and social relations. We will define and evaluate radicalism in the shifting contexts of liberation struggles. We will explore dissenting visions of social organization and alternative definitions of citizenship, progress, and freedom. We will confront the meaning of the intersection of race, gender, class, and sexuality in social movements.
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ASRC 3612 : World Drum and Dance Ensemble
Crosslisted as: MUSIC 3612 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Pan-African Drum and Dance Ensemble is an introductory performance course where students learn performance traditions from across West Africa. No prior experience is necessary. Students may choose to focus on drumming or dancing.
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ASRC 4115 : The Willard Straight Takeover and the Legacy of Black Students
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course focuses on the complex history related to this famous incident from 1969 and draws on a range of materials, including some of the archival resources available in the John Henrik Clarke Library. The April 19, 1969 incident known as "the Willard Straight Takeover" occurred during Parents' Weekend when black students occupied the student union on campus and, when threatened, returned with firearms in self-defense and also advocated for an Africana center to be developed.  When the takeover ended, the students were photographed by Steve Starr as they exited with their firearms.  This protest, even after nearly fifty years, remains misunderstood, and its facts are grossly distorted or exaggerated, and sometimes even forgotten or else omitted from major histories and timelines at Cornell.  The main goal in developing this course is to make a scholarly framework available in which they might expand and reinforce their knowledge of this topic, while contributing to new research on it.
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ASRC 4390 : Reconstruction and the New South
Crosslisted as: AMST 4039, ASRC 6391, HIST 4390, HIST 6391 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course focuses on the American South in the nineteenth century as it made the transition from Reconstruction to new forms of social organization and patterns of race relations. Reconstruction will be considered from a sociopolitical perspective, concentrating on the experiences of the freed people. The New South emphasis will include topics on labor relations, economic and political changes, new cultural alliances, the rise of agrarianism, and legalization of Jim Crow.
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ASRC 4501 : African Women Writers Critique the PostColonial State
Crosslisted as: ASRC 6105, ENGL 4501, FGSS 4501 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course reads and discusses representative literature from 20th century continental African writers with particular attention to the ways that African women examine the nature of the post-colonial state. We will focus on women writers but will but will set them against the context of the development of modern African literatures on the continent and in the African Diaspora.  We will also read some male texts and view some film which elucidate some specific angles of vision. We will examine specific texts as well as necessary critical and theoretical ideas which have been generated through, or with which this literature is in conversation.   Students will develop critical thinking and other analytical skills as they engage the meanings  of writing, audience, language and gender in African contexts.
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ASRC 4509 : Toni Morrison's Novels
Crosslisted as: AMST 4519, ASRC 6513, ENGL 4509, ENGL 6513, FGSS 4509, FGSS 6513 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison received her M.A. in English at Cornell University in 1955.  To study her, in a way, is to gain a deeper understanding of how she journeyed on from her days as a student here to become one of the world's greatest writers, how she has helped to transform world literature, and  how she has  shaped  Cornell's great legacy.  In this course, we will engage in close and reflective critical readings of Toni Morrison's eleven novels.  Morrison's writing style is characterized by highly distinctive strategies in the development of narrative and in the use of language.  Furthermore, from novel to novel, she is even known for developing features such as the very first sentence with great contemplation, an approach that also demonstrates her commitment to form.  As we journey across her body of work as readers, we will examine a range of recurring themes, along with the "love trilogy" on which she focused her repertoire for several years.  The course, through a comprehensive, chronological and focused look at Morrison's body of novels, will help students who entirely lack familiarity with it to gain a strong foundation for further research and study.  By the end of the course, even students who already know Morrison's work will walk away with a deeper and more nuanced critical understanding of it.  The course will help students to reinforce their skills in reading fiction, and help them to become more astute and exacting readers of the novel as a genre.  Morrison's novels have placed her at the vanguard of the globalization of the novel itself, and she is, undisputedly, one the most famous and innovative writers in the world.  She emerged as one of the greatest and most prolific writers of the twentieth century, and her audiences have continued to be captivated by her literary genius in this millennial age.  She is one of the most revered writers within the American literary establishment and has helped to reshape it both as a critic and novelist.  Her work can help one to develop more mastery in reading the novel as a genre.  Indeed, her thinking about this area is so original and pivotal that her fiction and critical works are absolutely indispensable for all serious students and scholars in fields such as American literature.  Its impact on African American literature is equally vital.  We will focus on reading the repertoire of novels by Morrison, including The Bluest Eye, Sula (1973), Song of Solomon (1977), Tar Baby (1981), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), Paradise (1998), Love (2003),  A Mercy (2008) Home (2012), and God Bless the Child (2014).  We will screen the 1998 film adaptation of her novel Beloved, along with documentaries related to Morrison such as Gail Pellet and Bill Moyers's Toni Morrison:  A Writer's Work and Gary Deans, Alan Hall and Jana Wendt's Toni Morrison: Uncensored.
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ASRC 4516 : Sociology of Race & Education
Crosslisted as: AMST 4516, ASRC 6516, SOC 4520 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
We will undertake an in-depth study of racial inequality and its relationship to schooling. The course content is centered primarily on the schooling challenges facing Black, Latino, Asian, and Native American students. We will investigate how issues such as the resegregation of schools, academic tracking, and teacher quality impact student achievement. The course reviews classic theoretical perspectives in the sociology of education, including education as social reproduction or cultural capital. Special attention will be given to the conceptualization and measurement of racial gaps in standardized test scores since the 1970s. We will also give some attention to how the debates surrounding race and education are influenced by popular discourse, including film documentaries.
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ASRC 4602 : Women and Gender Issues in Africa
Crosslisted as: ASRC 6602 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
There are two contrasting views of the status and role of women in Africa. One view portrays African women as controlled by men in all social institutions. Another view projects women as having a relatively favorable position in indigenous societies they were active with an identity independent of men's and no concentration of women in a private sphere while men controlled the public sphere. This course examines critical gender theories and women in historical and contemporary periods. The topics covered include: non-westernized/pre-colonial societies; the impact and legacy of colonial policies; access to education and knowledge; women in politics and the economy in local and global contexts; women's organizations; armed conflicts and peace; same gender love and evolving family values; the law and health challenges; the United Nations and World Conferences on Women: Mexico 1975, Copenhagen 1980, Nairobi 1985, Beijing 1995 and post-Beijing meetings, and the 2010 superstructure of UN Women, and Beijing +20 in 2015 with the UN Women's slogan "Empowering Women, Empowering Humanity: Picture it!"
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ASRC 4635 : Art! Poetry! Power!
Crosslisted as: AMST 4633, ENGL 4635, LSP 4635 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course begins in the center of the poetry, politics, and art of the U.S. civil rights movements, but also makes connections with the poetic and visual cultures of twenty-first century activism. Our exploration commences through a set of questions to guide our critical inquiry: Does art produce political resistance? Does art produce political consciousness? How can we read poster art and murals as texts or narratives? How does poetry perform or visualize a collective movement and political moment? By centering our study on these questions, we will move through the poster art, murals, and poems of Chicanos/as, U.S. Latinos/as, and African Americans during the 1960s and 1970s. Reading visual image, political proclamations, and spoken word as cultural texts, we will examine art and poetry for their knowledges about community, ethnicity, and racial experience in the U.S.
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ASRC 4682 : Healing and Medicine in Africa
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4682, BSOC 4682 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Healing and medicine are simultaneously individual and political, biological and cultural. In this class, we will study the expansion of biomedicine in Africa, the continuities and changes embodied in traditional medicine, and the relationship between medicine, science and law. We will explore the questions African therapeutics poses about the intimate ways that power works on and through bodies. Our readings will frame current debates around colonial and postcolonial forms of governance through medicine, the contradictions of humanitarianism and the health "crisis" in Africa, and the rise of new forms of "therapeutic citizenship." We will examine the ways in which Africa is central to the biopolitics of the contemporary global order.
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ASRC 4901 : Honors Thesis
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
For senior Africana Studies majors working on honors theses, with selected reading, research projects, etc., under the supervision of a member of the Africana Studies and Research Center faculty.
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ASRC 4903 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
For students working on special topics, with selected reading, research projects, etc., under the supervision of a member of the Africana Studies and Research Center faculty.
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ASRC 4940 : Cuba:The Repeating Island
Crosslisted as: LATA 4940, SPAN 4940 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
As Cuba and the United States move forward toward normalizing diplomatic relations, this course seizes the opportunity to contextualize and analyze Cuba and cubanidad as sites and trajectories of repression and contestation.  Through literature, visual culture, music, and blogs, we interrogate and problematize prevalent dichotomous representations of the island as a space of fragmentation/uniformity, monotony/contingency, and persecution/liberation.  Divided into four sections, this course deconstructs the transition from 'Pseudo' Republic to Revolution (Carpentier, Castro, Che Fernández Retamar), sexual alterity as a mechanism of revolt (Pinera, Sarduy, Arenas), the genre of 'dirty realism' during the so-caled 'Special Period' of the 1990's (Gutiérrez, Ponte), and contemporary dissidence in post-Fidel 'New Cuba' (blogs, performance art, rap and punk music).  Theoretical readings (Benitzer Rojo) accompany primary texts and frame key ideas with respect to political subjectivity, biopolitics, and space.
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ASRC 4995 : Body Politics in African Literature and Cinema
Crosslisted as: COML 4945, ENGL 4995, FGSS 4945, LGBT 4945, VISST 4945 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The course examines how postcolonial African writers and filmmakers engage with and revise controversial images of bodies and sexuality--genital cursing, same-sex desire, HIV/AIDS, genital surgeries, etc. Our inquiry also surveys African theorists' troubling of problematic tropes and practices such as the conception in 19th-century racist writings of the colonized as embodiment, the pathologization and hypersexualization of colonized bodies, and the precarious and yet empowering nature of the body and sexuality in the postcolonial African experience. As we focus on African artists and theorists, we also read American and European theorists, including but not certainly limited to Giorgio Agamben, Michel Foucault, Roland Barthes, and Joseph Slaughter, detecting the ways in which discourses around bodies in the African context may shape contemporary theories and vice versa.
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ASRC 6105 : African Women Writers Critique the PostColonial State
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4501, ENGL 4501, FGSS 4501 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course reads and discusses representative literature from 20th century continental African writers with particular attention to the ways that African women examine the nature of the post-colonial state. We will focus on women writers but will but will set them against the context of the development of modern African literatures on the continent and in the African Diaspora.  We will also read some male texts and view some film which elucidate some specific angles of vision. We will examine specific texts as well as necessary critical and theoretical ideas which have been generated through, or with which this literature is in conversation.   Students will develop critical thinking and other analytical skills as they engage the meanings  of writing, audience, language and gender in African contexts.
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ASRC 6212 : Michel Foucault: Sovereignty to BioPolitics
Crosslisted as: ENGL 6912, GOVT 6215 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will explore the ways in which Michel Foucault's oeuvre transitions from a concern with sovereignty to a preoccupation with biopolitics. Foucault's early work (one understands that there is no absolute Foucaultian division into "sovereignty" and "biopolitics"), such as "Madness and Civilization," attends to the structure, the construction and the force of the institution -- the birth of asylum, the prison, while his later career takes up the question of, for want of a better term, "political efficiency." That is, Foucault offers a critique of sovereignty insofar as sovereignty is inefficient (neither the sovereign nor sovereign power can be everywhere; certainly not everywhere it needs or wants to be; ubiquity is impossible, even/especially for a project such as sovereignty) while biopower is not. Biopower marks this recognition; in place of sovereignty biopower "devolves" to the individual subject the right, always an intensely political phenomenon, to make decisions about everyday decisions -- decisions about health, sexuality, "lifestyle." In tracing the foucaultian trajectory from sovereignty to biopower we will read the major foucaultian texts -- "Madness and Civilization," "Birth of the Prison," "History of Sexuality" as well as the various seminars where Foucault works out important issues.
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ASRC 6220 : Modern African Political Philosophy
Crosslisted as: PHIL 6461 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
What would happen if, instead of taking an instrumentalist view of the ideas of modern African political thinkers, we consider those ideas as indeed they are, attempts by them to proffer answers to the central questions of political philosophy as those are apprehended in the African context? If we did, we would end up with a robust, sophisticated discourse properly denominated 'Modern African Political Philosophy' in which we recognize, possibly celebrate and, ultimately, assess the quality of answers that African thinkers have provided.   In this Seminar, we shall be reading original works by African thinkers and do so in the context of modern political philosophy.  Participants in the course will work to create critical literature in response to these works as part of a more general effort to begin to create secondary resources in this relatively unexplored area of scholarship about Africa.  Each participant will be expected to produce a final piece that can be a candidate for, minimally, presentation at a learned conference and, maximally, publication in a journal. This is a seminar that is absolutely focused on intellectual production by its participants under the direction of the instructor.
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ASRC 6322 : Readings in 20th Century African-American History
Crosslisted as: AMST 6322, HIST 6322 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This graduate seminar will explore major currents in historical writing about African-American life and culture in the twentieth century. Focusing on social, intellectual, and labor history, we will identify key themes in recent studies of the formation of modern black communities and politics before and after World War Two. The course will place special emphasis on class, gender, social movements, and migration.
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ASRC 6391 : Reconstruction and the New South
Crosslisted as: AMST 4039, ASRC 4390, HIST 4390, HIST 6391 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course focuses on the American South in the nineteenth century as it made the transition from Reconstruction to new forms of social organization and patterns of race relations. Reconstruction will be considered from a sociopolitical perspective, concentrating on the experiences of the freed people. The New South emphasis will include topics on labor relations, economic and political changes, new cultural alliances, the rise of agrarianism, and legalization of Jim Crow.
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ASRC 6513 : Toni Morrison's Novels
Crosslisted as: AMST 4519, ASRC 4509, ENGL 4509, ENGL 6513, FGSS 4509, FGSS 6513 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison received her M.A. in English at Cornell University in 1955.  To study her, in a way, is to gain a deeper understanding of how she journeyed on from her days as a student here to become one of the world's greatest writers, how she has helped to transform world literature, and  how she has  shaped  Cornell's great legacy.  In this course, we will engage in close and reflective critical readings of Toni Morrison's eleven novels.  Morrison's writing style is characterized by highly distinctive strategies in the development of narrative and in the use of language.  Furthermore, from novel to novel, she is even known for developing features such as the very first sentence with great contemplation, an approach that also demonstrates her commitment to form.  As we journey across her body of work as readers, we will examine a range of recurring themes, along with the "love trilogy" on which she focused her repertoire for several years.  The course, through a comprehensive, chronological and focused look at Morrison's body of novels, will help students who entirely lack familiarity with it to gain a strong foundation for further research and study.  By the end of the course, even students who already know Morrison's work will walk away with a deeper and more nuanced critical understanding of it.  The course will help students to reinforce their skills in reading fiction, and help them to become more astute and exacting readers of the novel as a genre.  Morrison's novels have placed her at the vanguard of the globalization of the novel itself, and she is, undisputedly, one the most famous and innovative writers in the world.  She emerged as one of the greatest and most prolific writers of the twentieth century, and her audiences have continued to be captivated by her literary genius in this millennial age.  She is one of the most revered writers within the American literary establishment and has helped to reshape it both as a critic and novelist.  Her work can help one to develop more mastery in reading the novel as a genre.  Indeed, her thinking about this area is so original and pivotal that her fiction and critical works are absolutely indispensable for all serious students and scholars in fields such as American literature.  Its impact on African American literature is equally vital.  We will focus on reading the repertoire of novels by Morrison, including The Bluest Eye, Sula (1973), Song of Solomon (1977), Tar Baby (1981), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), Paradise (1998), Love (2003),  A Mercy (2008) Home (2012), and God Bless the Child (2014).  We will screen the 1998 film adaptation of her novel Beloved, along with documentaries related to Morrison such as Gail Pellet and Bill Moyers's Toni Morrison:  A Writer's Work and Gary Deans, Alan Hall and Jana Wendt's Toni Morrison: Uncensored.
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ASRC 6516 : Sociology of Race & Education
Crosslisted as: AMST 4516, ASRC 4516, SOC 4520 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
We will undertake an in-depth study of racial inequality and its relationship to schooling. The course content is centered primarily on the schooling challenges facing Black, Latino, Asian, and Native American students. We will investigate how issues such as the resegregation of schools, academic tracking, and teacher quality impact student achievement. The course reviews classic theoretical perspectives in the sociology of education, including education as social reproduction or cultural capital. Special attention will be given to the conceptualization and measurement of racial gaps in standardized test scores since the 1970s. We will also give some attention to how the debates surrounding race and education are influenced by popular discourse, including film documentaries.
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ASRC 6600 : Education and Development in Africa
Crosslisted as: EDUC 5020 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In the 1950s and 1960s, the human capital theory that emphasizes the importance of formal education for achievement of full productive potential of individuals and economic growth and development of countries enjoyed a renewed popularity. African countries promoted educational expansion with the expectation that it would lead to socio-economic development. The initial euphoria, however, was followed by skepticism and then disillusion.  Education, as it was being organized, delivered, received, and utilized, began to be perceived even as a hindrance to development. The course examines the relationship between formal education and individual and national development. Different paradigms of development, including modernization and dependency theories, and Third World Forum, are discussed with an emphasis on the perceived and actual roles of education in individual and national development. The issues to be discussed include education and schooling, the role of primary, secondary, and higher education in development, the problems of employment, language, equity in access and results with a focus on gender, race, and social class. Case studies, including selected countries of the different African sub-regions, will be used for illustration.
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ASRC 6602 : Women and Gender Issues in Africa
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4602 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
There are two contrasting views of the status and role of women in Africa. One view portrays African women as controlled by men in all social institutions. Another view projects women as having a relatively favorable position in indigenous societies they were active with an identity independent of men's and no concentration of women in a private sphere while men controlled the public sphere. This course examines critical gender theories and women in historical and contemporary periods. The topics covered include: non-westernized/pre-colonial societies; the impact and legacy of colonial policies; access to education and knowledge; women in politics and the economy in local and global contexts; women's organizations; armed conflicts and peace; same gender love and evolving family values; the law and health challenges; the United Nations and World Conferences on Women: Mexico 1975, Copenhagen 1980, Nairobi 1985, Beijing 1995 and post-Beijing meetings, and the 2010 superstructure of UN Women.
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ASRC 6901 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Independent study course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ASRC 6903 : Africana Studies Graduate Seminar
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The seminar is coordinated and supervised by one professor but team taught by three or four faculty members per semester. Each participating faculty member is responsible for a topical segment of the course related to her or his areas of specialization or an area of interest pertaining to theory and methodology of Africana Studies.
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ASRC 7682 : Healing and Medicine in Africa
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7682, BSOC 7682 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Healing and medicine are simultaneously individual and political, biological and cultural. In this class, we will study the expansion of biomedicine in Africa, the continuities and changes embodied in traditional medicine, and the relationship between medicine, science and law. We will explore the questions African therapeutics poses about the intimate ways that power works on and through bodies. Our readings will frame current debates around colonial and postcolonial forms of governance through medicine, the contradictions of humanitarianism and the health "crisis" in Africa, and the rise of new forms of "therapeutic citizenship." We will examine the ways in which Africa is central to the biopolitics of the contemporary global order.
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