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ASRC 6131 : A Greater Caribbean: New Approaches to Caribbean History
Crosslisted as: HIST 6131 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course is taught in conjunction with a course of the same title and scope at Yale University with Professor Anne Eller.  Over the thirteen weeks, we will engage with new work emerging about the Greater Caribbean in the context of Latin America, the African Diaspora, Atlantic History, Global History, comparative emancipation from chattel slavery, and the study of global revolution.  Students will make in-class presentations that locate these titles in a deeper historiography with classic texts.  This course crosses imperial boundaries of archives and historiography, in order to consider the intersecting allegiances, identities, itineraries, and diaspora of peoples, in local, hemispheric, and global context. Some central questions include: What is the lived geography of the Caribbean at different moments, and how does using different geographic and temporal frameworks help approach the region's history? What role did people living in this amorphously demarcated region play in major historical transformations of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries? How did the varied, but interconnected processes of Caribbean emancipation impact economic and political systems throughout the Atlantic and beyond? The course will conclude with a mini conference in which students of both universities will come together to discuss the state of the field and future directions in Caribbean history.
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ASRC 3101 : Advanced Arabic II
Crosslisted as: NES 3202 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
In this two-semester sequence, learners will be introduced to authentic, unedited Arabic language materials ranging from short stories, and poems, to newspaper articles dealing with social,  political,  and cultural issues. Emphasis will be on developing fluency in oral expression through discussions of issues presented in the reading and listening selections. There will be more focus on the development of native-like pronunciation and accurate use of grammatical structures than in the previous four courses. A primary objective of the course is the development of the writing skill through free composition exercises in topics of interest to individual students.  This course starts where NES 2200 leaves off and continues the development of the four language skills and grammar foundation using 18 themes, some new and some introduced in previous courses but are presented here at a more challenging level.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence have mastered over 3000 new words and will be able, within context of the 18 new and recycled themes to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations, 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, authentic, unedited passages of up to 400 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 300-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in NES 2200.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Advanced Mid to the Superior level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
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ASRC 3111 : Advanced Yoruba II
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course will help students expand their understanding of the Yoruba language through the communicative approach. We will focus on the four skills, speaking, listening, learning, and writing.
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ASRC 3114 : Advanced Zulu II
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The course is structured around IsiZulu Sanamuhla, a set of web-based learning materials that features Zulu-speaking students and families in South Africa.
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ASRC 6903 : Africana Studies Graduate Seminar
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The seminar is coordinated and supervised by one professor but team taught by three or four faculty members per semester. Each participating faculty member is responsible for a topical segment of the course related to her or his areas of specialization or an area of interest pertaining to theory and methodology of Africana Studies.
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ASRC 3742 : Africans and African Americans in Literature
Crosslisted as: AMST 3732, ENGL 3742 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
When an African and an African American meet, solidarity is presumed, but often friction is the result. In this course, we will consider how Africans and African Americans see each other through literature. What happens when two peoples suffering from double consciousness meet? We will examine the influence of historical forces including slavery, colonialism and pan-Africanism on the way writers explore the meeting between Africans and African Americans. Specifically we will look at how writers such as W.E.B DuBois, Maya Angelou, NoViolet Bulawayo, Chimamanda Adichie, Richard Wright, Eugene Robinson, Philippe Wamba, Teju Cole, and Malcolm X have understood the meeting.
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ASRC 3206 : Black Women and Political Leadership
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3606, FGSS 3206 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course studies the life experiences and political struggles of black women who have attained political leadership across the African Diaspora. It will study their rise to political power through an examination of the autobiographies of women political leaders from the Caribbean, the U.S., Africa and Brazil. The autobiographies of political figures such as Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Shirley Chisholm, Benedita da Silva will serve as some of the primary sources of analysis. Students will have the opportunity to meet current or past political figures where timely and available.
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ASRC 3740 : Contemporary African American Poetry
Crosslisted as: AMST 3742, ENGL 3740 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course will examine a variety of voices in contemporary African American poetry, focusing on works produced in the decades following the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements. We will consider how new generations of black poets are using verse to represent personal and collective history; to interrogate race and other social categories like gender and sexuality; and to ungate new perspectives for understanding the human condition. Along with verse, we will also study other forms of poetry like Hip Hop and spoken word that inform the contemporary African American lyric. Authors will include Rita Dove, Yusef Komunyakaa, Elisabeth Alexander, Natasha Threthewey, Terrance Hayes, and Lyrae Van Clief-Stefanon.
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ASRC 6600 : Education and Development in Africa
Crosslisted as: EDUC 5020 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
In the 1950s and 1960s, the human capital theory that emphasizes the importance of formal education for achievement of full productive potential of individuals and economic growth and development of countries enjoyed a renewed popularity. African countries promoted educational expansion with the expectation that it would lead to socio-economic development. The initial euphoria, however, was followed by skepticism and then disillusion.  Education, as it was being organized, delivered, received, and utilized, began to be perceived even as a hindrance to development. The course examines the relationship between formal education and individual and national development. Different paradigms of development, including modernization and dependency theories, and Third World Forum, are discussed with an emphasis on the perceived and actual roles of education in individual and national development. The issues to be discussed include education and schooling, the role of primary, secondary, and higher education in development, the problems of employment, language, equity in access and results with a focus on gender, race, and social class. Case studies, including selected countries of the different African sub-regions, will be used for illustration.
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ASRC 1202 : Elementary Arabic II
Crosslisted as: NES 1202, NES 1202, NES 1202, NES 1202, NES 1202 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This two-course sequence assumes no previous knowledge of Arabic and provides a thorough grounding in the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It starts with the alphabet and the number system and builds the four skills gradually and systematically through carefully selected and organized materials focusing on specific, concrete and familiar topics such as self identification, family, travel, food, renting an apartment, study, the weather, etc.). These topics are listed in the textbook's table of contents.  The student who successfully completes the two-course sequence will have mastered about 1000 basic words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations on a limited range of practical topics such as self-identification, family, school, work, the weather, travel, etc., 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 180 words written in Arabic script, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 50-word paragraph in Arabic.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Novice to the Intermediate Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
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ASRC 1107 : Elementary Swahili for Global Health
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course is intended for students whom will be spending the summer in Tanzania for the Global Health Program.  To prepare students to live and learn in Tanzania, this course will provide an introduction to and foundation in basic Kiswahili.  Students will develop the capacity to communicate with Tanzanian peers and homestay families, as well as develop the competency to navigate community life in Tanzania. Since this is a one credit seminar, this course does NOT fulfill a language requirement for colleges or majors.This course is intended for students whom will be spending the summer in Tanzania for the Global Health Program.  To prepare students to live and learn in Tanzania, this course will provide an introduction to and foundation in basic Kiswahili.  Students will develop the capacity to communicate with Tanzanian peers and homestay families, as well as develop the competency to navigate community life in Tanzania. Since this is a one credit seminar, this course does NOT fulfill a language requirement for colleges or majors.
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ASRC 1100 : Elementary Swahili I
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Provides an introduction to the Swahili language and culture. In this course, students engage in short conversations and communicative tasks in interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational modes on diverse topics such as family, communication and interactions, daily routines, shopping, asking for and giving directions, food, transportation, mood expressions and cultural sensitivity, etc. Students are also given tasks to help them develop knowledge of cultural aspects and language situations that are likely to be encountered in daily life interactions while in any Swahili speaking country. No prior knowledge of the language is required. Literature and cultural competence materials are incorporated into the course, along with audio-visual and web-based materials. By the end of this course students should be able at to reach proficiency level Novice Mid According to the American Council of on the Teaching of Foreign Language (ACTFL) www.actfl.org
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ASRC 1101 : Elementary Swahili II
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Increases the ability to comprehend, express, and respond to the communicative tasks assigned inside and outside the classroom on topics pertaining to daily life settings. All listening exercises aim at preparing students to improve their speaking competence. Be prepared to actively participate in conversations, to express ideas, to give short descriptions, ask questions on daily life situations, as well as read and write Swahili short stories/compositions. Literature and cultural competence materials are incorporated into the course, along with audio-visual and web-based materials. Elementary Swahili I is the prerequisite for this course. By the end of this course students should be able at to reach proficiency level Intermediate low According to the American Council of on the Teaching of Foreign Language (ACTFL) www.actfl.org
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ASRC 1105 : Elementary Swahili Study Abroad
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor: Description
ASRC 1118 : Elementary Wolof II
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Wolof is an African language. It is widely spoken in West Africa in countries such as Senegal, The Gambia and Mauritania. Wolof is the most widely spoken language in Senegal.  There are strong historical and contemporary links between the African American experiences and West Africa. Senegal and Wolof are important links in these experiences. Wolof has some influence on some West European languages. Banana is a Wolof word and it is also an English word! Study Wolof, Know Africa and Know the world! Wolof is an African language. It is widely spoken in West Africa in countries such as Senegal, The Gambia and Mauritania. Wolof is the most widely spoken language in Senegal.  There are strong historical and contemporary links between the African American experiences and West Africa. Senegal and Wolof are important links in these experiences.   Wolof has some influence on some West European languages. Banana is a Wolof word and it is also an English word! Study Wolof, Know Africa and Know the world!
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ASRC 1116 : Elementary Zulu II
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
IsiZulu is the most widely spoken language in the Southern African region and it is an official language of South Africa. This two-semester beginners' course emphasizes speaking and listening, and trains students to communicate in everyday situations.  In acquiring this competence, students are introduced to the structure of the language and to the significant status of Zulu language and culture in contemporary multilingual South Africa.  The course is structured around IsiZulu Sanamuhla, a set of web-based learning materials that features Zulu-speaking students and families in South Africa.IsiZulu is the most widely spoken language in the Southern African region and it is an official language of South Africa. This two-semester beginners' course emphasizes speaking and listening, and trains students to communicate in everyday situations.  In acquiring this competence, students are introduced to the structure of the language and to the significant status of Zulu language and culture in contemporary multilingual South Africa.  The course is structured around IsiZulu Sanamuhla, a set of web-based learning materials that features Zulu-speaking students and families in South Africa.
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ASRC 4310 : Engaging NYC: Oral History and Ethnography
Crosslisted as: AMST 4410, AMST 6410, ANTHR 4711, ANTHR 7711, ASRC 6310 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This engaged-learning course offers students a unique chance to gain valuable experience collaborating with a social justice organization in New York City. The class will impart proficiency in the research methods used by ethnographers and oral historians studying urban communities of color. Students will work with community partners to conceptualize real-world solutions to the problems community members are experiencing. We will address questions including: How can we use anthropology and oral history to influence public policies on education, housing, police practices and income inequality? How do differences in positionality  (i.e. race, class, gender, age) between the interviewer and the interviewee affect the production of ethnography and oral history?  The course will include travel to New York City and will require a significant commitment to engaged-learning. 
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ASRC 6310 : Engaging NYC: Oral History and Ethnography
Crosslisted as: AMST 4410, AMST 6410, ANTHR 4711, ANTHR 7711, ASRC 4310 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This engaged-learning course offers students a unique chance to gain valuable experience collaborating with a social justice organization in New York City. The class will impart proficiency in the research methods used by ethnographers and oral historians studying urban communities of color. Students will work with community partners to conceptualize real-world solutions to the problems community members are experiencing. We will address questions including: How can we use anthropology and oral history to influence public policies on education, housing, police practices and income inequality? How do differences in positionality  (i.e. race, class, gender, age) between the interviewer and the interviewee affect the production of ethnography and oral history?  The course will include travel to New York City and will require a significant commitment to engaged-learning. 
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ASRC 3333 : Ethics and Society: Aid and Its Consequences
Crosslisted as: PHIL 2941 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The course looks at the connection between ethics and society.  It does so by focusing on the issues raised by the phenomenon of aid, giving or receiving it, and how we understand and react to it.  We seek to make sense of aid and its place In society.  We explore the ethics of aid from the point of view of philosophy.  We move to working through the implications of aid for (1) the giver; (2) the receiver; (3) the society, local and global; (4) the relations between individuals in a given society with respect to aid and; (5) relations between one society and its members and another society when they engage in aid-related activities.
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ASRC 3520 : Farewell to the Party of Lincoln: Race, Class and Populism in the Age of Trump
Crosslisted as: AMST 3530, HIST 3502 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Drawing on both historical and contemporary readings, this course seeks to reflect on the political and ideological legacies that offer contextualization for the rise of Donald Trump as the leader of the Republican party in the 2016 national election.   We will critically examine the intertwined politics of race and class beginning with the origin of the Republican party, and the crises of secession and Civil War over the South's demands for the expansion of U.S. chattel slavery.  The struggles of African Americans for freedom and citizenship then and afterward provided a crucial backdrop for white-working class populisms of the left and right.  Although the modern GOP's c. 1980s turn to racially-charged, nativist, anti-government sentiment predated the rise of Trump, our approach will allow us to understand Trump's takeover of today's Republican party within a U.S. political tradition shaped by race, gender, region, class and populism.
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ASRC 2870 : Freedom Writes: Literature of Global Justice Struggles
Crosslisted as: ENGL 2870 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course examines some major justice movements of the modern era, introducing students to a submerged history that should neither be idealized nor forgotten. One goal will be to connect the ongoing struggles for social justice of minoritized populations in the US with the history of struggles for justice by workers, women, and disempowered social groups across the world. We'll begin with the work of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and Gandhi, and conclude with a look at contemporary activist movements.  Along the way, we'll look at such cultural forms as AIDS quilts, urban murals, the music of Bob Marley, and theatrical productions from prisons, as well as Anna Deveare Smith's Twilight L.A. and Helena Viramontes' novel Under the Feet of Jesus.
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ASRC 1830 : FWS: Black Expatriate Writing
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
We will examine the phenomenon of the global dimensions of post-World War II African American struggles for equality through the writings of black expatriates in Europe and Africa, and the international presence of black performing artists and intellectuals, as well. We will examine the work of several figures, including James Baldwin, Richard Wright, Maya Angelou, Josephine Baker, Paul Robeson, Malcolm X and Julian Mayfield
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ASRC 1841 : FWS: Exotic/Erotic Blackness: Race, Sex and Cultural Consumption
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor: Description
ASRC 1842 : FWS: Exploring Food (In)Justice: Race, Class, and U.S. Food Movements
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This seminar explores issues of injustice constructed around race, class, and food in the United States. Students think critically about real-world problems related to food access and security while studying three intersecting, yet countering U.S. food movements: corporate industrial agriculture, local food, and food justice, that impact the way food is produced, distributed, and consumed. We pay particular attention to efforts in these food movements that mitigate and exacerbate race and class-based inequalities within the social, cultural, economic, and political contexts of the U.S. food system.  Our exploration of food (in)justice relies on the idea that the U.S. food system is what Omi and Winant (1994) call a racial project—political and economic undertakings through which racial hierarchies are established and racialized subjectivities are created.
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ASRC 1822 : FWS: The African American Short Story
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The short story is an ideal genre through which one might gain a basic introduction to African American literature and its major themes. As a form and genre, the short story's specific origins within African American literature are traceable back to the antebellum era of the nineteenth century. The genre was significantly advanced in the post-bellum era by authors such as Charles Chesnutt, thrived throughout the twentieth century, and continues to develop in contemporary African American literature. In this course, we will consider short stories by Chesnutt, Jessie Fauset, Nella Larsen, Arna Bontemps, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, Langston Hughes, James Baldwin, Ann Petry, Rosa Guy, Paule Marshall, Ernest J. Gaines, and Toni Morrison. The primary goal of this course as a First-Year Writing Seminar is to reinforce the skills of students in good and effective writing. Through weekly entries in a reading journal, the production of six papers, including several of which will be revised, and periodic in-class writing exercises, students will produce an extensive portfolio of written materials over the course of the semester. This course is designed to give students one of the strongest possible foundations upon which to build for success as writers in the years at Cornell and beyond.
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ASRC 1840 : FWS: The Prize and the Peril: African Nations at Fifty
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor: Description
ASRC 4901 : Honors Thesis
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
For senior Africana Studies majors working on honors theses, with selected reading, research projects, etc., under the supervision of a member of the Africana Studies and Research Center faculty.
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ASRC 4903 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
For students working on special topics, with selected reading, research projects, etc., under the supervision of a member of the Africana Studies and Research Center faculty.
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ASRC 6901 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Independent study course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ASRC 2200 : Intermediate Arabic II
Crosslisted as: NES 2200, NES 2200 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
In this two-course sequence learners continue to develop the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing and grammar foundation through the extensive use of graded materials on a wide variety of topics.  While more attention is given to developing native-like pronunciation and to grammatical accuracy than in NES 1201 and NES 1202, the main focus of the course will be on encouraging fluency and facility in understanding the language and communicating ideas in it.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence will have mastered over 1500 new words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations related to a wide variety of topics beyond those covered in NES 1201 and NES 1202, such as the history and geography of the Arab world, food and health, sports, economic matters, the environment, politics, the Palestine problem, etc. 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 300 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 150-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in NES 1202.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Intermediate Mid to the Advanced Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
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ASRC 2102 : Intermediate Swahili II
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Intermediate Swahili levels I and II in general impart speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills beyond Swahili elementary level to participate with ease and confidence in familiar topics and exchange information on unfamiliar topics. Students are assigned communicative tasks such as respond to a situation with a short text and take part in a discussion after viewing short video clips and prompts to elicit speaking and listening competence and cultural awareness responses beyond elementary level. The language and cultural scenarios practiced are designed to help students demonstrate language responses beyond familiar topics, and to feel comfortable conversing with Swahili native speakers, as well as to blend in and feel welcomed as part of the community while exploring different topics such as acquaintanceship, relationships, health, festivals, education, sports, housing, politics, commerce, travel, etc. Short stories are used to depict cultural aspects such as cultural expressions, proverbs, sayings, and riddles. Literature and cultural materials are incorporated into the course, along with audio-visual and web-based material. In this course, students have an opportunity to participate in language conversation outside the classroom and explore the opportunities for study abroad in East Africa. Swahili Elementary I and II are prerequisite for this course. By the end of this course, students should be able to reach proficiency level Intermediate High according to the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) www.actfl.org.
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ASRC 2119 : Intermediate Wolof II
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The course is structured around IsiZulu Sanamuhla, a set of web-based learning materials that features Zulu-speaking students and families in South Africa.
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ASRC 2111 : Intermediate Yoruba II
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Intermediate Yoruba II is a follow-up to Intermediate Yoruba I. It is a fourth-semester Yoruba language course. The course assists students to acquire advanced level proficiency in reading, speaking, writing, and listening in Yoruba language. Students are introduced to grammatical and syntactic structures in the language that will assist them in describing, presenting, and narrating information in the basic tenses. At the end of the course, students will be able to listen to, process, and understand programs produced for native speakers in media such as television, radio, and films. They will be able to read and understand short stories, novels, and plays written for native speakers of the language.
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ASRC 2117 : Intermediate Zulu II
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The course is structured around IsiZulu Sanamuhla, a set of web-based learning materials that features Zulu-speaking students and families in South Africa.
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ASRC 2650 : Introduction to African American Literature
Crosslisted as: AMST 2650, ENGL 2650 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course will introduce students to the African American literary tradition. Through aesthetic and contextual approaches, we will consider how African American life and culture has defined and constituted the United States of America. From slave narratives to Hip-Hop music, we will trace the range of artistic conventions and cultural movements while paying close attention to broader historical shifts in American life over the past three centuries. We will ask: How do authors create and define a tradition? What are some of the recurring themes and motifs within this tradition? Authors will include: David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, W.E.B. DuBois, Zora Neale Hurston, Lorraine Hansberry, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Claudia Rankine, and Chimamanda Adichie.
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ASRC 2204 : Introduction to Quranic Arabic
Crosslisted as: NES 2204, RELST 2204 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course is designed for students who are interested in reading the language of the Qur'an with accuracy and understanding. The first week (4 classes) will be devoted to an introduction of the history of the Qur'an: the revelation, collection, variant readings, and establishment of an authoritative edition. The last week will be devoted to a general overview of "revisionist" literature on the Qur'an. In the remaining 12 weeks, we will cover all of Part 30 (Juz' 'Amma, suuras 78-114) and three suuras of varying length (36, 19, and 12).
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ASRC 1109 : Introduction to Yoruba II
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
A two-semester beginner's course in Yoruba Language and Culture. Organized to offer Yoruba language skills and proficiency in speaking, reading, listening, writing, and translation. Focus is placed on familiar informal and formal contexts, e.g., home, school, work, family, social situations, politics, etc. Course uses Yoruba oral literature, proverbs, rhetoric, songs, popular videos, and theater, as learning tools for class comprehension. First semester focuses on conversation, speaking, and listening.  Second semester focuses on writing, translation and grammatical formation. Through the language course students gain basic background for the study of an African culture, arts, and history both in the continent and in the diaspora. Yoruba language is widely spoken along the west coast of Africa and in some African communities in diaspora.  Yoruba video culture, theater, music, and arts has a strong influence along the west coast and in the diaspora.A two-semester beginner's course in Yoruba language and culture. Organized to offer Yoruba language skills and proficiency in speaking, reading, listening, writing, and translation. Focus is placed on familiar informal and formal contexts, e.g., home, school, work, family, social situations, politics. Course uses Yoruba oral literature, proverbs, rhetoric, songs, popular videos, and theater as learning tools for class comprehension. First semester focuses on conversation, speaking, and listening. Second semester focuses on writing, translation, and grammatical formation. Through the language course students gain basic background for the study of an African culture, arts, and history both on the continent and in the diaspora. Yoruba language is widely spoken along the west coast of Africa and in some African communities in diaspora. Yoruba video culture, theater, music, and arts have strong influence along the west coast and in the diaspora.
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ASRC 3330 : Is China Recolonizing Africa?
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3333 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
One key question about China's rise as an economic power has been what it does or is doing around the world. In this regard, China observers have taken note of emergence as the largest investors of late on the African continent. Also of significance is the fact that Chinese investments in Africa has been primarily in natural resources. This course is not about the benefits the concentration of investments in natural resources. Rather, it is about the manners in which China has defined its interests in Africa, pursued those interests, and the consequences that China's behavior for global governance, the domestic politics of African states, and the future well-being of African populations. Put into questions, the aims of this course are as follow: Should anyone should anyone worry about China's presence in Africa? Is China's presence part of the recolonizing of the Continent? Alternatively, is China's foray part of a global struggle for positioning between an emergent China and Africa's so-called traditional allies in the West? 
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ASRC 4291 : Marriage and Divorce in the African Context
Crosslisted as: FGSS 4291, FGSS 6291, HIST 4291, HIST 6291 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Marriage was the widely expected norm within African societies. The institution was an important marker of adulthood, linking individuals and lineages in a network of mutual cooperation and support. Marriage practices and the concomitant gender expectations varied significantly between societies, and over time. As a result, marriage and divorce are especially rich terrain for exploring social history, women's agency, discursive constructions of 'women', masculinity and gender relations of power. This course explores some of the newest scholarship on marriage by Africanist scholars. The readings demonstrate the wide cultural variety in marriage as well as the dynamic relationship between marriage and historical change. They especially highlight women's roles and expectations in marriage, masculinity and the ways men and women negotiated the rules and boundaries of marriage.
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ASRC 2220 : Masculinities
Crosslisted as: FGSS 2230, LGBT 2230 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course begins with the hypothesis that there is not one version of masculinity but rather multiple masculinities, as influenced by  race, ethnicity, class, nationality, sexuality, disability and produced differently in various historical contexts. Exploring the relationship between sex and gender, as it appears across twentieth century U.S. cultural history, this class uses pop cultural texts, visual art, autobiography, and fiction to attend to the ways masculinities and femininities have been structured in dialogue with one another.
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ASRC 6220 : Modern African Political Philosophy
Crosslisted as: PHIL 6461 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
What would happen if, instead of taking an instrumentalist view of the ideas of modern African political thinkers, we consider those ideas as indeed they are, attempts by them to proffer answers to the central questions of political philosophy as those are apprehended in the African context? If we did, we would end up with a robust, sophisticated discourse properly denominated 'Modern African Political Philosophy' in which we recognize, possibly celebrate and, ultimately, assess the quality of answers that African thinkers have provided.   In this Seminar, we shall be reading original works by African thinkers and do so in the context of modern political philosophy.  Participants in the course will work to create critical literature in response to these works as part of a more general effort to begin to create secondary resources in this relatively unexplored area of scholarship about Africa.  Each participant will be expected to produce a final piece that can be a candidate for, minimally, presentation at a learned conference and, maximally, publication in a journal. This is a seminar that is absolutely focused on intellectual production by its participants under the direction of the instructor.
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ASRC 2504 : Obama and the Meaning of Race
Crosslisted as: AMST 2504, GOVT 2604, SOC 2520 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The election of Barack Obama to the presidency has raised new questions in the American debate on race, politics, and social science. Has America entered a post-racial society in which racism and inequality are things of the past? Or does Obama's post-Black, race-neutral approach to governing signal the end of Black politics, race-based activism and prescriptive policy? In this course, students will use the Obama presidency to think, talk, and write about how race works in America. We'll examine the symbolism of Obama's personal narrative and biracialism to analyze his race-neutral campaigns and governing within the context of history, politics, and policies. We'll look at the public image of Michelle Obama, especially how she is gendered as Black radical and fashionista.
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ASRC 1790 : Pirates, Slaves, and Revolutionaries: A History of the Caribbean from Columbus to Louverture
Crosslisted as: HIST 1970 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
What is the Caribbean? How did its native inhabitants fared in the aftermath of the arrival of Europeans? How did the region shift from a Spanish Lake to a heavily contested geopolitical site where all European powers vied for political and commercial superiority? What were the main production systems of the region and how did they result in dramatic environmental change? How did the eighteenth-century revolutions transform the Caribbean? In this introductory survey to Caribbean history we will answer these and many other questions through the study of the political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental transformations of the Caribbean from the arrival of Columbus to the era of the Haitian Revolution. We will follow indigenous people, Spanish conquistadors, English, Dutch, and French pirates and privateers, planters, and merchants, imperial officers, slaves, sailors, and revolutionaries as they adapted to the multiple transformations that shaped this region. Through lectures, discussions, and readings of primary and secondary sources we will navigate the Caribbean in a quest to understand the historical processes that gave shape to this tropical paradise.
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ASRC 6322 : Readings in 20th Century African-American History
Crosslisted as: AMST 6322, HIST 6322 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This graduate seminar will explore major currents in historical writing about African-American life and culture in the twentieth century. Focusing on social, intellectual, and labor history, we will identify key themes in recent studies of the formation of modern black communities and politics before and after World War Two. The course will place special emphasis on class, gender, social movements, and migration.
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ASRC 3020 : Representing Brooklyn: Race, Place and Popular Culture
Crosslisted as: AMST 3020, ANTHR 3020 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Hip Hop Brooklyn. Hipster Brooklyn. Immigrant Brooklyn. Brownstone Brooklyn. This course borrows from hip hop's notion of "representing" to explore popular and cultural understandings of race and place in Brooklyn as depicted in print, music, film, and online. How is Brooklyn represented? Who represents Brooklyn? What do these representations reveal about Black cultural production, inequality, and identity formation more broadly speaking? While today Brooklyn is New York City's hippest borough and the site of swift gentrification, booming real estate, and the ever-escalating displacement of immigrant and Black communities, in the 1980s and 1990s it was a hotbed of hip hop music, making the borough synonymous with Black cultural production. Now a "global brand," New York's most populous borough is still the home of the nation's most concentrated Black population. The course examines Black cultural production as it relates to representations of Brooklyn. It also deconstructs images and discourses that marginalize the borough's Black residents. Spanning the period from 1945 to the present day, emphases will include the grassroots movements of the 1960s-1970s, the commodification of hip hop in the 1980s-1990s, and close readings of films including Spike Lee's "Do the Right Thing," to reflect on how Black popular culture engages with Brooklyn's diverse communities. While materials are interdisciplinary in approach, our investigation is informed by anthropological, historical, and literary texts covering topics including immigration, youth culture, transnationalism, gentrification, authenticity, and classed, gendered and racialized inequality.
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ASRC 1900 : Research Strategies in Africana and Latino Studies
Crosslisted as: LSP 1101, LSP 1101 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The digital revolution has made an enormous amount of information available to research scholars, but discovering resources and using them effectively can be challenging. This course introduces students with research interests in Latino and Africana Studies to search strategies and methods for finding materials in various formats (e.g., digital, film, and print) using information databases such as the library catalog, print and electronic indexes, and the World Wide Web. Instructors provide equal time for lecture and hands-on learning. Topics include government documents, statistics, subject-specific online databases, social sciences, the humanities, and electronic citation management.
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ASRC 4513 : Science Fiction and the Value of Utopia/Dystopia
Crosslisted as: COML 4513, ENGL 4903 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
A pronounced turn away from utopian discourses has long been felt across multiple academic registers—aspects of queer theory rejecting futurity, portions of the radical left adopting a similar politics of no future, and scholars in African-American studies debating the idea of an Afro-pessimism, to name just a few examples. This accumulation of tragic thought brings the question: Does the utopian text no longer hold any value in the development of alternative political thought? This course, grounded in science fiction, will address this question via the thoughtful examination of a range of theoretical, fictional, and cinematic texts. Works to be studied throughout the semester will come from, among others, Frederick Jameson, Carlos Fuentes, Aldous Huxley, Alfonso Cuarón, Colson Whitehead, and Samuel Delany.
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ASRC 4611 : Screening Blackness
Crosslisted as: PMA 4961, SHUM 4611 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The seminar "Screening Blackness" provides a theoretical, cultural, and historical focus on "blackness" in film, media, and visual culture. Considering questions of performance, censorship, embodiment, pleasure, and representational politics, we will evaluate how race, particularly Black skin, has been used as a signifier and complex code for various things on screen. In doing so, we will investigate how blackness is contingent on the specifics of its historical, social, and cultural production and, yet, open to multiple and competing claims. Therefore, blackness here is less a stable racial category than theoretical motor, operated by moving and contested discourses, histories, images, meanings, and performances by Black subjects. Focusing on Black skin representation and discourses of blackness as a cultural signifier, students will watch and discuss important representations and misrepresentations of blackness on screen.
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ASRC 4516 : Sociology of Race & Education
Crosslisted as: AMST 4516, ASRC 6516, SOC 4520 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
We will undertake an in-depth study of racial inequality and its relationship to schooling. The course content is centered primarily on the schooling challenges facing Black, Latino, Asian, and Native American students. We will investigate how issues such as the resegregation of schools, academic tracking, and teacher quality impact student achievement. The course reviews classic theoretical perspectives in the sociology of education, including education as social reproduction or cultural capital. Special attention will be given to the conceptualization and measurement of racial gaps in standardized test scores since the 1970s. We will also give some attention to how the debates surrounding race and education are influenced by popular discourse, including film documentaries.
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ASRC 6516 : Sociology of Race & Education
Crosslisted as: AMST 4516, ASRC 4516, SOC 4520 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
We will undertake an in-depth study of racial inequality and its relationship to schooling. The course content is centered primarily on the schooling challenges facing Black, Latino, Asian, and Native American students. We will investigate how issues such as the resegregation of schools, academic tracking, and teacher quality impact student achievement. The course reviews classic theoretical perspectives in the sociology of education, including education as social reproduction or cultural capital. Special attention will be given to the conceptualization and measurement of racial gaps in standardized test scores since the 1970s. We will also give some attention to how the debates surrounding race and education are influenced by popular discourse, including film documentaries.
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ASRC 3590 : The Black Radical Tradition in the U.S.
Crosslisted as: AMST 3590, HIST 3590 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course provides a critical historical interrogation of what Black Marxism author Cedric Robinson called "the Black Radical Tradition." It will introduce students to some of the major currents in the history of black radical thought, action, and organizing, with an emphasis on the United States after World War I. It relies on social, political, and intellectual history to examine the efforts of black people who have sought not merely social reform, but a fundamental restructuring of political, economic, and social relations. We will define and evaluate radicalism in the shifting contexts of liberation struggles. We will explore dissenting visions of social organization and alternative definitions of citizenship, progress, and freedom. We will confront the meaning of the intersection of race, gender, class, and sexuality in social movements.
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ASRC 2670 : The History and Politics of Modern Egypt
Crosslisted as: GOVT 2673, HIST 2672, NES 2670 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This lecture class will explore the socio-cultural history of modern Egypt from the late 18th century to the 21st century "Arab Spring." We will explore Egyptian history under the Ottomans and the Mamluks, the unsuccessful French attempts to colonize Egypt, and the successful British occupation of the country. We will then examine the development of Egyptian nationalism from the end of the 19th century through Nasser's pan-Arabism to the 2011 Egyptian Revolution. We will accomplish this with the aid of a variety of texts and media, including novels and films.
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ASRC 4066 : The Powers of Skin in Africa
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4106, SHUM 4606 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This class considers the capacities and powers of skin in Africa. Students will read classic historical and ethnographic texts about practices involving skin together with range of theoretical approaches to the body. We will consider topics from beatification, scarification, witchcraft, magic, and traditional medicine to the hygiene campaigns of colonialism, the development of the dermatology as a defined specialty, the rise of global health and medical humanitarianism. Descriptive ethnographic and historical texts will be read as primary evidence along side of a range of theoretical approaches to the lived body with the intention of provoking innovative readings of these primary texts and a greater understanding of the theoretical arguments.
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ASRC 6115 : The Willard Straight Takeover & the Legacy of Black Students
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4115 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course focuses on the complex history related to this famous incident from 1969 and draws on a range of materials, including some of the archival resources available in the John Henrik Clarke Library.  It is interdisciplinary and comparative in orientation and incorporates community outreach and service.  The April 19, 1969 incident known as "the Willard Straight Takeover" occurred during Parents' Weekend when black students occupied the student union on campus and, when threatened, returned with firearms in self-defense and also advocated for an Africana center to be developed.  When the takeover ended, the students were photographed by Steve Starr as they exited with their firearms.  The image won a Pulitzer Prize and has become iconic and world-famous.  This protest, which one of its most vocal critics has identified as a catalyst for the nation's "culture wars," is one of the most important events in the history of Cornell University, even if the memory has been deeply unsettling for some.  Yet, even after nearly fifty years have passed, this event remains misunderstood, and its facts are sometimes grossly distorted or exaggerated.  Even worse, sometimes this history has been forgotten or else routinely omitted from major histories and timelines at Cornell.  In all of these respects, it is absolutely crucial to set the record straight.  The topic of the Willard Straight Takeover is one of great interest and fascination among many students.  The main goal in developing this course is to make a scholarly framework available in which they might expand and reinforce their knowledge of this topic, for so many students are curious about this history.  Black women were central in the development of this student movement from its inception, a role that is frequently discussed in relation to the incident with black female students at Wari House.  One of the goals of the course is to highlight the crucial contributions of women to the Willard Straight Takeover, which have sometimes been overlooked.  This background underscores that there is no one history or narrative of the Willard Straight Takeover incident, but many overlapping histories, and that gender, race, and class have been central factors in constituting them.  Architecture, even, past and present, plays a central role in shaping perceptions of and myths about this event.  Given the importance of outreach, building coalitions and supporting a range of peer fields on campus, this course will also serve as a vital context for reinforcing knowledge of the Latino Day Hall Takeover in 1993 during the Thanksgiving Break, which occurred to discuss the possibility for creating a Latino Living Center and a Latino Studies Program.  An important aspect as we proceed will be investigating the black student movement in national and global perspective and its relation to the civil rights and Black Power movement, from San Francisco State to Jackson State and beyond.  Our campus libraries, including the John Henrik Clark Library at the Africana Center, hold a wealth of resources in a range of genres related to this incident, including films and videos, essays, photographs, interviews, and articles.  Students will explore these materials as a way of gaining a basic historical introduction to this incident.  In the process, they will reinforce their skills for analyzing and interpreting various media and archival materials.  An added benefit of this course it that it is also designed to reinforce skills that they are building in a diverse range of academic coursework, along with their technological literacies.  This course honors and pays tribute to the history and meaning of the Willard Straight Takeover in 1969 as an event that was not only about Cornell, but also drew in the Ithaca community.  A priority will be to facilitate the development of student projects and community outreach initiatives.  
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ASRC 4115 : The Willard Straight Takeover and the Legacy of Black Students
Crosslisted as: ASRC 6115 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course focuses on the complex history related to this famous incident from 1969 and draws on a range of materials, including some of the archival resources available in the John Henrik Clarke Library.  It is interdisciplinary and comparative in orientation and incorporates community outreach and service.  The April 19, 1969 incident known as "the Willard Straight Takeover" occurred during Parents' Weekend when black students occupied the student union on campus and, when threatened, returned with firearms in self-defense and also advocated for an Africana center to be developed.  When the takeover ended, the students were photographed by Steve Starr as they exited with their firearms.  The image won a Pulitzer Prize and has become iconic and world-famous.  This protest, which one of its most vocal critics has identified as a catalyst for the nation's "culture wars," is one of the most important events in the history of Cornell University, even if the memory has been deeply unsettling for some.  Yet, even after nearly fifty years have passed, this event remains misunderstood, and its facts are sometimes grossly distorted or exaggerated.  Even worse, sometimes this history has been forgotten or else routinely omitted from major histories and timelines at Cornell.  In all of these respects, it is absolutely crucial to set the record straight.  The topic of the Willard Straight Takeover is one of great interest and fascination among many students.  The main goal in developing this course is to make a scholarly framework available in which they might expand and reinforce their knowledge of this topic, for so many students are curious about this history.  Black women were central in the development of this student movement from its inception, a role that is frequently discussed in relation to the incident with black female students at Wari House.  One of the goals of the course is to highlight the crucial contributions of women to the Willard Straight Takeover, which have sometimes been overlooked.  This background underscores that there is no one history or narrative of the Willard Straight Takeover incident, but many overlapping histories, and that gender, race, and class have been central factors in constituting them.  Architecture, even, past and present, plays a central role in shaping perceptions of and myths about this event.  Given the importance of outreach, building coalitions and supporting a range of peer fields on campus, this course will also serve as a vital context for reinforcing knowledge of the Latino Day Hall Takeover in 1993 during the Thanksgiving Break, which occurred to discuss the possibility for creating a Latino Living Center and a Latino Studies Program.  An important aspect as we proceed will be investigating the black student movement in national and global perspective and its relation to the civil rights and Black Power movement, from San Francisco State to Jackson State and beyond.  Our campus libraries, including the John Henrik Clark Library at the Africana Center, hold a wealth of resources in a range of genres related to this incident, including films and videos, essays, photographs, interviews, and articles.  Students will explore these materials as a way of gaining a basic historical introduction to this incident.  In the process, they will reinforce their skills for analyzing and interpreting various media and archival materials.  An added benefit of this course it that it is also designed to reinforce skills that they are building in a diverse range of academic coursework, along with their technological literacies.  This course honors and pays tribute to the history and meaning of the Willard Straight Takeover in 1969 as an event that was not only about Cornell, but also drew in the Ithaca community.  A priority will be to facilitate the development of student projects and community outreach initiatives.
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ASRC 2006 : Understanding Global Capitalism Through Service Learning
Crosslisted as: AMST 2016, HIST 2006 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course is a seminar focused on a service-learning approach to understanding the history of neoliberal transformations of the global economy through the lens of an island (Jamaica) and a community (Petersfield.) Building on the success of last year's global service-learning course and trip to Petersfield, and now bringing the course under the auspices of both the Engaged Cornell and Cornell Abroad administrative and funding capabilities. Students will attend class each week and will also take a one-week service trip over spring break to work with the local community partner (AOC) in Petersfield. We will also work with Amizade, a non-profit based in Pittsburgh, who is the well-established partner of the AOC and which works with numerous universities on global service learning projects. They have a close relationship with CU Engaged Learning and Research.
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ASRC 3220 : Was US Intervention in Libya To Remove Gaddafi a Mistake?
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3223, NES 3223 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Questions have arisen recently about the wisdom of the 2011 Western intervention in Libya, which resulted in the removal and assassination of Colonel Gaddafi, that country's long-time ruler. The question is being asked today in relation to the political chaos that ensued and the rise in today's Libya of political movements and forces favorable or connected to Al-Qaeda and ISIS. This course is not intended to settle that question as is currently formulated. Instead, the course approaches the question of intervention in Libya in terms of the connections between global governance, the responsibility to protect, and political order and democracy in the zones of intervention. In this context, the course has two aims. The first is to contrast the approach of the African Union to the resolution of the Libyan crisis, which was summarily dismissed by the US and its allies, with the preferred approach of the Permanent Western members of the UN Security Council.  The second aim is to examine the manner in which the responsibility to protect was executed in Libya and the lessons that might be gained from it. 
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ASRC 4602 : Women and Gender Issues in Africa
Crosslisted as: ASRC 6602 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
There are two contrasting views of the status and role of women in Africa. One view portrays African women as controlled by men in all social institutions. Another view projects women as having a relatively favorable position in indigenous societies they were active with an identity independent of men's and no concentration of women in a private sphere while men controlled the public sphere. This course examines critical gender theories and women in historical and contemporary periods. The topics covered include: non-westernized/pre-colonial societies; the impact and legacy of colonial policies; access to education and knowledge; women in politics and the economy in local and global contexts; women's organizations; armed conflicts and peace; same gender love and evolving family values; the law and health challenges; the United Nations and World Conferences on Women: Mexico 1975, Copenhagen 1980, Nairobi 1985, Beijing 1995 and post-Beijing meetings, and the 2010 superstructure of UN Women.
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ASRC 6602 : Women and Gender Issues in Africa
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4602 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
There are two contrasting views of the status and role of women in Africa. One view portrays African women as controlled by men in all social institutions. Another view projects women as having a relatively favorable position in indigenous societies they were active with an identity independent of men's and no concentration of women in a private sphere while men controlled the public sphere. This course examines critical gender theories and women in historical and contemporary periods. The topics covered include: non-westernized/pre-colonial societies; the impact and legacy of colonial policies; access to education and knowledge; women in politics and the economy in local and global contexts; women's organizations; armed conflicts and peace; same gender love and evolving family values; the law and health challenges; the United Nations and World Conferences on Women: Mexico 1975, Copenhagen 1980, Nairobi 1985, Beijing 1995 and post-Beijing meetings, and the 2010 superstructure of UN Women.
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ASRC 3120 : Yoruba Foreign Language Across the Curriculum (FLAC)
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This 1-credit optional course aims to expand the students' vocabulary, and advance their speaking and reading skills as well as enhance their knowledge and deepen their cultural understanding by supplementing non-language courses throughout the University.
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