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Kevin K. Gaines

W.E.B. Du Bois Professor

Overview

Kevin K. Gaines is the W.E.B. Du Bois Professor of Africana Studies and History at Cornell University.  He is author of Uplifting the Race: Black Leadership, Politics, and Culture During the Twentieth Century (University of North Carolina Press, 1996), which was awarded the John Hope Franklin Prize of the American Studies Association.  His book, American Africans in Ghana: Black Expatriates and the Civil Rights Era (UNC Press, 2006) was a Choice Outstanding Academic Title.  He is a past president of the American Studies Association (2009-10).  From 1987 to 1991, he was Jazz Director at WBRU-FM in Providence, Rhode Island, and on-air host of jazz, blues, and reggae programs. 

His essays, columns and reviews on African American history, art, music, literature, and contemporary culture have been published in major newspapers, journals, and magazines, including the New York Times, Ebony, The Providence Journal, American Quarterly, American Historical Review, The Journal of American History, American Literary History, Small Axe, Radical History Review, Truthout, and Social Text.  He has lectured at universities throughout the U.S. as well as internationally, in Japan, Korea, England, France, Ghana, South Africa, and Australia.

Departments/Programs

  • Africana Studies and Research Center
  • American Studies Program

Graduate Fields

  • Africana Studies
  • History

Research

His current research projects include books on African American history in global perspective, and on the era of racial integration in the United States. 

Courses

Publications

“How Racial Divisions at Colleges Start in a Segregated Society” Ebony Magazine (March 9, 2016)

“Music is a World:  Stevie Wonder and the Sound of Black Power,” in Nico Slate, ed., Black Power Beyond Boundaries (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012), pp. 191-212.

“From Colonization to Anticolonialism: Lincoln in Africa,” in The Global Lincoln, eds. Richard Cawardine and Jay Sexton (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011), pp. 259-271.