Current Courses

Sort by: TitleNumber
Filter by:

View all Summer 2019 courses.

ASRC 1120 : Wonder Women
Crosslisted as: DSOC 1120, MUSIC 1520 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Catherine Appert
Susan Daniel
Lori Leonard
Noliwe Rooks
This course brings together students, faculty, and invited guests to discuss the art of leadership and the opportunities and challenges women in leadership roles have encountered in their careers and how they have managed them. The sessions will be held in North Campus faculty residences and will feature prominent women from different professions and walks of life. Potential speakers include politicians; artists; writers; scientists; women in spiritual life; and business owners and entrepreneurs. Speakers will share their stories with students in an informal way, opening up faculty-facilitated discussions about gender, leadership, accomplishment, work-life balance, and mentorship. These talks may be interspersed with or supplemented by reading and discussion of recent writing on women and leadership.            
View course details
Description
ASRC 1121 : Reel Africa
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Siba Grovogui
Description
ASRC 1121 : Reel Africa
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Siba Grovogui
Description
ASRC 1201 : Elementary Arabic I
Crosslisted as: ARAB 1201, ARAB 1201, ARAB 1201, ARAB 1201, ARAB 1201 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Munther Younes
Bilal Al-Omar
This two-course sequence assumes no previous knowledge of Arabic and provides a thorough grounding in the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It starts with the alphabet and the number system and builds the four skills gradually and systematically through carefully selected and organized materials focusing on specific, concrete and familiar topics such as self identification, family, travel, food, renting an apartment, study, the weather, etc.). These topics are listed in the textbook's table of contents.  The student who successfully completes the two-course sequence will have mastered about 1000 basic words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations on a limited range of practical topics such as self-identification, family, school, work, the weather, travel, etc., 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 180 words written in Arabic script, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 50-word paragraph in Arabic.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Novice to the Intermediate Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
View course details
Description
ASRC 1202 : Elementary Arabic II
Crosslisted as: ARAB 1202, ARAB 1202, ARAB 1202, ARAB 1202 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Abdel-Fattah Shahda
Bilal Al-Omar
Makda Weatherspoon
This two-course sequence assumes no previous knowledge of Arabic and provides a thorough grounding in the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It starts with the alphabet and the number system and builds the four skills gradually and systematically through carefully selected and organized materials focusing on specific, concrete and familiar topics such as self identification, family, travel, food, renting an apartment, study, the weather, etc.). These topics are listed in the textbook's table of contents.  The student who successfully completes the two-course sequence will have mastered about 1000 basic words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations on a limited range of practical topics such as self-identification, family, school, work, the weather, travel, etc., 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 180 words written in Arabic script, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 50-word paragraph in Arabic.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Novice to the Intermediate Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
View course details
Description
ASRC 1203 : Intermediate Arabic I
Crosslisted as: ARAB 1203, ARAB 1203 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Makda Weatherspoon
In this two-course sequence learners continue to develop the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing and grammar foundation through the extensive use of graded materials on a wide variety of topics.  While more attention is given to developing native-like pronunciation and to grammatical accuracy than in ARAB 1201 and ARAB 1202, the main focus of the course will be on encouraging fluency and facility in understanding the language and communicating ideas in it.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence will have mastered over 1500 new words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations related to a wide variety of topics beyond those covered in ARAB 1201 and ARAB 1202, such as the history and geography of the Arab world, food and health, sports, economic matters, the environment, politics, the Palestine problem, etc. 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 300 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 150-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in ARAB 1202.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Intermediate Mid to the Advanced Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
View course details
Description
ASRC 1500 : Introduction to Africana Studies
Crosslisted as: AMST 1500, GOVT 1503 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Siba Grovogui
This course offers an introduction to the study of Africa, the U.S., the Caribbean and other diasporas.  This course will examine, through a range of disciplines, among them literature, history, politics, philosophy, the themes - including race/racism, the Middle Passage, sexuality, colonialism, and culture - that have dominated Africana Studies since its inception in the late-1960s. We will explore these issues in the attempt to understand how black lives have been shaped, in a historical sense; and, of course, the effects of these issues in the contemporary moment. This course seeks to introduce these themes, to investigate through one or more of the disciplines relevant to the question, and to provide a broad understanding of the themes so as to enable the kind of intellectual reflection critical to Africana Studies.
View course details
Description
ASRC 1500 : Introduction to Africana Studies
Crosslisted as: AMST 1500, GOVT 1503 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Siba Grovogui
This course offers an introduction to the study of Africa, the U.S., the Caribbean and other diasporas.  This course will examine, through a range of disciplines, among them literature, history, politics, philosophy, the themes - including race/racism, the Middle Passage, sexuality, colonialism, and culture - that have dominated Africana Studies since its inception in the late-1960s. We will explore these issues in the attempt to understand how black lives have been shaped, in a historical sense; and, of course, the effects of these issues in the contemporary moment. This course seeks to introduce these themes, to investigate through one or more of the disciplines relevant to the question, and to provide a broad understanding of the themes so as to enable the kind of intellectual reflection critical to Africana Studies.
View course details
Description
ASRC 1595 : African American History From 1865
Crosslisted as: AMST 1595, HIST 1595 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Russell Rickford
Focusing on political and social history, this course surveys African-American history from Emancipation to the present. The class examines the post-Reconstruction "Nadir" of black life; the mass black insurgency against structural racism before and after World War II; and the Post-Reform Age that arose in the wake of the dismantling of legal segregation. The course will familiarize students with the basic themes of African-American life and experience and equip them to grasp concepts of political economy; class formation; and the intersection of race, class and gender.
View course details
Description
ASRC 1841 : FWS: Exotic/Erotic Blackness: Race, Sex and Cultural Consumption
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
How did Blackness become an object of curiosity, desire and fascination? How did it become exotic? In this course, we will see that this is not the result of a recent development in the representation of black bodies. Rather the construction of Blackness as exotic/erotic originates as far as the beginnings of colonialism. We will look at how and why black bodies have been sexualized and commodified through literary and media representation. We will then turn to works by black intellectuals and writers who analyze and resist this form of cultural consumption. Students will critically address these issues and demonstrate their knowledge of the material through close readings and essay writing.
View course details
Description
ASRC 1848 : FWS: Black Autobiography in the 21st Century
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
ASRC 1900 : Research Strategies in Africana and Latino Studies
Crosslisted as: LSP 1101 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Anthony Cosgrave
The digital revolution has made an enormous amount of information available to research scholars, but discovering resources and using them effectively can be challenging. This course introduces students with research interests in Latino and Africana Studies to search strategies and methods for finding materials in various formats (e.g., digital, film, and print) using information databases such as the library catalog, print and electronic indexes, and the World Wide Web. Instructors provide equal time for lecture and hands-on learning. Topics include government documents, statistics, subject-specific online databases, social sciences, the humanities, and electronic citation management.
View course details
Description
ASRC 2003 : Africa: The Continent and Its People
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
N'Dri Assie-Lumumba
An introductory interdisciplinary course focusing on Africa's geographical, ecological, social and demographic characteristics; indigenous institutions and values; multiple cultural heritage of Africanity, Islam, Western civilization, and emerging Asian/Chinese influence. Main historical developments and transition;  contemporary political, economic, social and cultural change with technological factor. Africa's ties with the United States (from trans-Atlantic slavery to the present). Its impact on the emerging world order and its contribution to world civilization will also be explored.
View course details
Description
ASRC 2112 : Black Spirituality, Religion & Protest
Crosslisted as: AMST 2112, HIST 2112, RELST 2112 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Margaret Washington
This course examines Black spirituality, religion, and protest from an historical perspective, beginning with African traditions and Christianity during enslavement, which created resistance ideology and racial nationalism. Prophetic Christianity and church formation became primary political weapons after enslavement, particularly in the Age of Jim Crow, and foundationally led to twentieth century civil rights movements. While exploring these themes, the course will also analyze the complexities and contractions (i.e. Southern Baptist Convention, Nation of Islam and Black Lives Matter) inherent in resistance movements based on spiritual leadership.
View course details
Description
ASRC 2200 : Intermediate Arabic II
Crosslisted as: ARAB 2202, ARAB 2202 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Abdel-Fattah Shahda
In this two-course sequence learners continue to develop the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing and grammar foundation through the extensive use of graded materials on a wide variety of topics.  While more attention is given to developing native-like pronunciation and to grammatical accuracy than in ARAB 1201 and ARAB 1202, the main focus of the course will be on encouraging fluency and facility in understanding the language and communicating ideas in it.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence will have mastered over 1500 new words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations related to a wide variety of topics beyond those covered in ARAB 1201 and ARAB 1202, such as the history and geography of the Arab world, food and health, sports, economic matters, the environment, politics, the Palestine problem, etc. 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 300 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 150-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in ARAB 1202.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Intermediate Mid to the Advanced Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
View course details
Description
ASRC 2204 : Introduction to Quranic Arabic
Crosslisted as: ARAB 2204, RELST 2204 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Munther Younes
This course is designed for students who are interested in reading the language of the Qur'an with accuracy and understanding. The first week (4 classes) will be devoted to an introduction of the history of the Qur'an: the revelation, collection, variant readings, and establishment of an authoritative edition. The last week will be devoted to a general overview of "revisionist" literature on the Qur'an. In the remaining 12 weeks, we will cover all of Part 30 (Juz' 'Amma, suuras 78-114) and three suuras of varying length (36, 19, and 12).
View course details
Description
ASRC 2212 : Caribbean Worlds
Crosslisted as: ENGL 2512, LSP 2212 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Carole Boyce Davies
This introductory course to the study of the Caribbean will begin with examinations of what constitutes the Caribbean and an understanding of Caribbean space.  We will then study its peoples, contact between Europeans and indigenous peoples, African enslavement and resistance, Indian indentureship and other forced migrations.  By mid semester we will identify a cross-section of leading thinkers and ideas. We will also pay attention to issues of identity, migration and the creation of the Caribbean diaspora. Constructions of tourist paradise and other stereotypes and the development of critical Caribbean institutions and national development will be discussed as we read and listen to some representative oral and written literature of the Caribbean and view some relevant film on the Caribbean. This inter-disciplinary survey provides students with a foundation for more specialized coursework on the Caribbean offered in our department.
View course details
Description
ASRC 2235 : New Visions in African Cinema
Crosslisted as: COML 2235, ENGL 2935 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Naminata Diabate
This undergraduate course introduces the formal and topical innovations that African cinema has experienced since its inception in the 1960s. Sections will explore, among others, Nollywood, sci-fi, and ideological cinema. Films include: Abderrahmane Sissako's Bamako, Mohamed Camara's Dakan, Djibril Diop Mambéty's Touki-Bouki, Cheikh Oumar Sissoko's Finzan, Anne-Laure Folly's Women with Open Eyes, Ousmane Sembène's Camp de Thiaroye, Jean-Pierre Bekolo's Quartier Mozart.
View course details
Description
ASRC 2360 : Music and Islam
Crosslisted as: MUSIC 2360, NES 2360, RELST 2360 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Leila Tayeb
What does Islam "say" about music? This course will trace circulations of this question in scholarly, popular, media, and religious discourses. Why and how does it matter what sound is called music and not, what music is called Islamic and not? We ask both how the thinking and the doing of music and Islam have been entangled in particular moments and places and how and why Muslim and non-Muslim scholars have sought out these entanglements. No prior study of music or Islam is required.
View course details
Description
ASRC 2505 : Literature, Sport, and Ideology
Crosslisted as: ENGL 2751 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Grant Farred
There is a sentence that is 65 pages long in Don DeLillo's novel "Underworld." Nothing but an unending series of elliptical thoughts, phrases, incomplete thoughts, fragments. Only a novel about the "shot heard around the world," we might argue, could produce such a sentence. We will read DeLillo's novel, and not only to see if this sentence actually exists. There is nothing more ideological than sport -there is a good reason why some critics prefer to call it "war by other means" - in this course we will explore the connection amongst sport, ideology and literature. We will read novels, historical memoirs, short stories and works that defy categorization. We will wander the globe, from cricket in the Caribbean (CLR James) to football in Latin America (Eduardo Galeano, "Soccer in Sun and Shadow"), books about baseball ("The Boys of Summer") and a story about Roger Federer.
View course details
Description
ASRC 2512 : Black Women in the 20th Century
Crosslisted as: AMST 2512, FGSS 2512, HIST 2512 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Margaret Washington
This course focuses on African American women in the 20th century. The experiences of black women will be examined from a social, practical, communal, and gendered perspective. Topics include the Club Woman's movement, suffrage, work, family, black and white women and feminism, black women and radicalism, and the feminization of poverty.
View course details
Description
ASRC 2543 : In the Crossfire of Empires: Africa and World War II
Crosslisted as: HIST 2543 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Judith Byfield
World War II was one of the most transformative periods in the history of the 20th century. As a result, scholars, writers and filmmakers continue to re-examine the war from multiple angles. Nonetheless, most accounts of the war marginalize Africa's role and the consequences of the war for African communities.   This course considers the new historiography on World War II that aims to put the 'world' back into our analysis of WW II and considers the ways in which imperialism, race and gender shaped the prosecution and the consequences of the war.  It focuses specifically on Africa's social, economic and political engagement with the powers at the center of the conflict and introduces students to emerging debates in African historiography and the historiography of World War II. 
View course details
Description
ASRC 2631 : Race and Modern US History
Crosslisted as: AAS 2641, AMST 2645, HIST 2641 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Derek Chang
This course surveys modern U.S. history, from Reconstruction to the contemporary period. It will examine how race has been the terrain on which competing ideas of the American nation have been contested. From struggles over citizenship rights to broader meanings of national belonging, we will explore how practices, ideas, and representations have shaped political, cultural, and social power. A key concern for this course is examining how groups and individuals have pursued racial justice from the late-nineteenth century to the present.
View course details
Description
ASRC 2670 : The History and Politics of Modern Egypt
Crosslisted as: GOVT 2673, HIST 2672, NES 2670 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Ziad Fahmy
This lecture class will explore the socio-cultural history of modern Egypt from the late 18th century to the 21st century "Arab Spring." We will explore Egyptian history under the Ottomans and the Mamluks, the unsuccessful French attempts to colonize Egypt, and the successful British occupation of the country. We will then examine the development of Egyptian nationalism from the end of the 19th century through Nasser's pan-Arabism to the 2011 Egyptian Revolution. We will accomplish this with the aid of a variety of texts and media, including novels and films.
View course details
Description
ASRC 2870 : Freedom Writes: Literature of Global Justice Struggles
Crosslisted as: ENGL 2870 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Paul Sawyer
This course examines some major justice movements of the modern era, introducing students to a submerged history that should neither be idealized nor forgotten. One goal will be to connect the ongoing struggles for social justice of minoritized populations in the US with the history of struggles for justice by workers, women, and disempowered social groups across the world. We'll begin with the work of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and Gandhi, and conclude with a look at contemporary activist movements.  Along the way, we'll look at such cultural forms as AIDS quilts, urban murals, the music of Bob Marley, and theatrical productions from prisons, as well as Anna Deveare Smith's Twilight L.A. and Helena Viramontes' novel Under the Feet of Jesus.
View course details
Description
ASRC 2955 : Socialism in America
Crosslisted as: AMST 2955, HIST 2955 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Russell Rickford
"Why no socialism in America?" Scholars and activists have long pondered the relative dearth (compared to other industrialized societies) of sustained, popular, anticapitalist activity in the United States. Sure, leftist movements in the U.S. have often looked and operated differently than those in other parts of the world. But many Americans have forged creative and vibrant traditions of anticapitalism under very difficult circumstances. This class examines socialist thought and practice in the U.S. from the 19th century to the present. We trace intersections of race, class, and gender while exploring the freedom dreams of those who have opposed capitalism in the very heart of global power.
View course details
Description
ASRC 3020 : Representing Brooklyn: Race, Place and Popular Culture
Crosslisted as: AMST 3020, ANTHR 3020 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Oneka LaBennett
Hip Hop/Hipster/Immigrant/Brownstone Brooklyn. This course borrows from hip hop's notion of "representing" to explore popular and cultural understandings of race and place in Brooklyn as depicted in print, music, film, and online. While today Brooklyn is New York City's hippest borough and the site of swift gentrification, booming real estate, and the ever-escalating displacement of immigrant and Black communities, in the 1980s and 1990s it was a hotbed of hip hop music, making the borough synonymous with Black cultural production. The course examines Black cultural production as it relates to representations of Brooklyn and deconstructs images and discourses that marginalize the borough's Black residents. Spanning the period from 1945 to the present day, the commodification of hip hop in the 1980s-1990s, and close readings of films including Spike Lee's "Do the Right Thing," to reflect on how Black popular culture engages with Brooklyn's diverse communities. While materials are interdisciplinary in approach, our investigation is informed by anthropological, historical, and literary texts covering topics including immigration, youth culture, transnationalism, gentrification, authenticity, and classed, gendered and racialized inequality.
View course details
Description
ASRC 3020 : Representing Brooklyn: Race, Place and Popular Culture
Crosslisted as: AMST 3020, ANTHR 3020 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Oneka LaBennett
Hip Hop/Hipster/Immigrant/Brownstone Brooklyn. This course borrows from hip hop's notion of "representing" to explore popular and cultural understandings of race and place in Brooklyn as depicted in print, music, film, and online. While today Brooklyn is New York City's hippest borough and the site of swift gentrification, booming real estate, and the ever-escalating displacement of immigrant and Black communities, in the 1980s and 1990s it was a hotbed of hip hop music, making the borough synonymous with Black cultural production. The course examines Black cultural production as it relates to representations of Brooklyn and deconstructs images and discourses that marginalize the borough's Black residents. Spanning the period from 1945 to the present day, the commodification of hip hop in the 1980s-1990s, and close readings of films including Spike Lee's "Do the Right Thing," to reflect on how Black popular culture engages with Brooklyn's diverse communities. While materials are interdisciplinary in approach, our investigation is informed by anthropological, historical, and literary texts covering topics including immigration, youth culture, transnationalism, gentrification, authenticity, and classed, gendered and racialized inequality.
View course details
Description
ASRC 3022 : Dave Chappelle: American Comic
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Grant Farred
Using Iceberg Slim's "Pimp," Sigmund Freud's writing on humor, Richard Pryor's "Pryor Convictions" (inter alia), as well as Chappelle's own work (from his standup routines to clips from the "Chappelle Show"), this course will explore Chappelle's singularity as American comic.
View course details
Description
ASRC 3031 : Race and Revolution in the Americas: 1776-1900
Crosslisted as: AMST 3032, HIST 3031, LATA 3031 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Margaret Washington
This course will examine the "age of democratic revolutions" in the Americas from the perspective of the Black Atlantic. During this momentous era, when European monarchies were successfully challenged and constitutional governments created, Blacks fomented their own American revolutions both in the outside of evolving "New World democracies." This course examines the black trajectory in British North America, Latin America, the French (especially Haiti,) the British and the Spanish Caribbean. The course begins with black participation in the U.S. independence War (1776-1781) and concludes with black (non-U.S.) participation in the independence wars against Spain. The course will also briefly address post-emancipation race relations in these American countries. 
View course details
Description
ASRC 3100 : Advanced Arabic I
Crosslisted as: ARAB 3201 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Bilal Al-Omar
In this two-semester sequence, learners will be introduced to authentic, unedited Arabic language materials ranging from short stories, and poems, to newspaper articles dealing with social,  political,  and cultural issues. Emphasis will be on developing fluency in oral expression through discussions of issues presented in the reading and listening selections. There will be more focus on the development of native-like pronunciation and accurate use of grammatical structures than in the previous four courses. A primary objective of the course is the development of the writing skill through free composition exercises in topics of interest to individual students.  This course starts where ARAB 2202 leaves off and continues the development of the four language skills and grammar foundation using 18 themes, some new and some introduced in previous courses but are presented here at a more challenging level.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence have mastered over 3000 new words and will be able, within context of the 18 new and recycled themes to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations, 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, authentic, unedited passages of up to 400 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 300-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in ARAB 2202.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Advanced Mid to the Superior level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
View course details
Description
ASRC 3101 : Advanced Arabic II
Crosslisted as: ARAB 3202 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Bilal Al-Omar
In this two-semester sequence, learners will be introduced to authentic, unedited Arabic language materials ranging from short stories, and poems, to newspaper articles dealing with social,  political,  and cultural issues. Emphasis will be on developing fluency in oral expression through discussions of issues presented in the reading and listening selections. There will be more focus on the development of native-like pronunciation and accurate use of grammatical structures than in the previous four courses. A primary objective of the course is the development of the writing skill through free composition exercises in topics of interest to individual students.  This course starts where ARAB 2202 leaves off and continues the development of the four language skills and grammar foundation using 18 themes, some new and some introduced in previous courses but are presented here at a more challenging level.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence have mastered over 3000 new words and will be able, within context of the 18 new and recycled themes to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations, 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, authentic, unedited passages of up to 400 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 300-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in ARAB 2202.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Advanced Mid to the Superior level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
View course details
Description
ASRC 3206 : Black Women and Political Leadership
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3606, FGSS 3206 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Carole Boyce Davies
This course studies the life experiences and political struggles of black women who have attained political leadership. It will study their rise to political power through an examination of the autobiographies of women from the Caribbean, the U.S., Africa and Brazil. Political figures such as Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Shirley Chisholm, Benedita da Silva will serve as some of the primary sources of analysis and discussion. Students will have the opportunity to select and follow a political leader and her challenges closely. The first half of the course will examine some of the general literature on the subject; the second half will study the women in their own words. We will attempt to have some available local political leaders visit the class.
View course details
Description
ASRC 3310 : Afro-Asia: Futurism and Feminisms
Crosslisted as: FGSS 3310 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Aidan Kelly
Description
ASRC 3333 : Ethics and Society: Aid and Its Consequences
Crosslisted as: PHIL 2941 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Olufemi Taiwo
The course looks at the connection between ethics and society.  It does so by focusing on the issues raised by the phenomenon of aid, giving or receiving it, and how we understand and react to it.  We seek to make sense of aid and its place In society.  We explore the ethics of aid from the point of view of philosophy.  We move to working through the implications of aid for (1) the giver; (2) the receiver; (3) the society, local and global; (4) the relations between individuals in a given society with respect to aid and; (5) relations between one society and its members and another society when they engage in aid-related activities.
View course details
Description
ASRC 3480 : Brazilian Culture through its Music
Crosslisted as: LATA 3480, MUSIC 3480, PORT 3480 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Steven Pond
Few areas of cultural expression can rise to the importance of music in Brazilian life. This seminar-style course employs discussion, critical reading and listening – and hands-on music-making – to investigate Brazilian culture, history, and politics through the lens of its music.  Samba will be a significant focus, but we will also discuss a range of additional regional and national styles. Along with two class meetings per week, our "discussion" will coincide with rehearsals for Deixa Sambar, Cornell's Brazilian ensemble. The course will be taught in English. Music experience is not necessary, but engagement in music-making is an integral part of the course.
View course details
Description
ASRC 3506 : Slavery and Visual Culture
Crosslisted as: AMST 3506, ARTH 3506, COML 3681, VISST 3506 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Cheryl Finley
This interdisciplinary undergraduate lecture examines the visual culture of slavery and the transatlantic slave trade from the 16th century to the present. Lectures present artifacts, prints, paintings, photographs, sculpture, film and installation art that images the history of slavery and its profound contemporary resonance. Lectures and assignments consider the following themes: how does the gaze structure vision and influence the control of historical narratives? Which themes dominate the visual culture of slavery? How does visual culture encode memory, violence or racism? How did the visual culture of slavery produce and circulate new technologies of vison? Where is the history of slavery visible in the built environment or the local landscape? Students study artifacts in the May Anti-Slavery Collection at Kroch Library and artworks at the Johnson Museum. Field trip to nearby anti-slavery sites of memory.
View course details
Description
ASRC 3550 : Modeling Race, Fashioning Beauty
Crosslisted as: AMST 3560, FGSS 3540 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Noliwe Rooks
This course explores written and visual biographies of African American and African women in the fashion industry as a launching point for thinking about beauty, race, gender and class. Some of the questions that will be explored during the semester are: How do ethnicity and femininity intersect? How are authenticity and difference commodified? How do women construct identities through narrative or craft themselves through body modification? How do women negotiate their relationships to their bodies, families and nations? Contemporary television programs, global fashion and cultural studies will also be discussed. Students will write self-narratives about their relationships with cultural standards of beauty.
View course details
Description
ASRC 3612 : Pan-African Drum and Dance Ensemble
Crosslisted as: MUSIC 3612, PMA 3212 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Isaac Anim
Pan-African Drum and Dance Ensemble is an introductory performance course where students learn performance traditions from across West Africa. No prior experience is necessary. Students may choose to focus on drumming or dancing.
View course details
Description
ASRC 3612 : Pan-African Drum and Dance Ensemble
Crosslisted as: MUSIC 3612, PMA 3212 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Isaac Anim
Catherine Appert
Pan-African Drum and Dance Ensemble is an introductory performance course where students learn performance traditions from across West Africa. No prior experience is necessary. Students may choose to focus on drumming or dancing.
View course details
Description
ASRC 3742 : Africans and African Americans in Literature
Crosslisted as: AMST 3732, ENGL 3742 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Mukoma Ngugi
When an African and an African American meet, solidarity is presumed, but often friction is the result. In this course, we will consider how Africans and African Americans see each other through literature. What happens when two peoples suffering from double consciousness meet? We will examine the influence of historical forces including slavery, colonialism and pan-Africanism on the way writers explore the meeting between Africans and African Americans. Specifically we will look at how writers such as W.E.B DuBois, Maya Angelou, NoViolet Bulawayo, Chimamanda Adichie, Richard Wright, Eugene Robinson, Philippe Wamba, Teju Cole, and Malcolm X have understood the meeting.
View course details
Description
ASRC 4115 : The Willard Straight Takeover and the Legacy of Black Students
Crosslisted as: ASRC 6115 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Riche Richardson
This course focuses on the complex history related to this famous incident from 1969 and draws on a range of materials, including some of the archival resources available in the John Henrik Clarke Library. The April 19, 1969 incident known as "the Willard Straight Takeover" occurred during Parents' Weekend when black students occupied the student union on campus and, when threatened, returned with firearms in self-defense and also advocated for an Africana center to be developed.  When the takeover ended, the students were photographed by Steve Starr as they exited with their firearms.  This protest, even after nearly fifty years, remains misunderstood, and its facts are grossly distorted or exaggerated, and sometimes even forgotten or else omitted from major histories and timelines at Cornell.  The main goal in developing this course is to make a scholarly framework available in which they might expand and reinforce their knowledge of this topic, while contributing to new research on it.
View course details
Description
ASRC 4115 : The Willard Straight Takeover and the Legacy of Black Students
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Riche Richardson
Focuses on the complex history related to this famous incident from 1969 and draws on a range of materials. The year marks the 50th anniversary of this historic occupation. The April 19, 1969 incident known as "the Willard Straight Takeover" or "Willard Straight Occupation" occurred during Parents' Weekend when black students occupied the student union on campus and, when threatened, returned with firearms in self-defense and also advocated for an Africana center to be developed. This protest, which one of its most vocal critics has identified as a catalyst for the nation's "culture wars," is one of the most important events in the history of Cornell University. Yet, even after fifty years have passed, this event remains misunderstood, and its facts are sometimes grossly distorted or exaggerated. Even worse, sometimes this history has been forgotten or else routinely omitted from major histories and timelines at Cornell. The main goal in developing this course is to make a scholarly framework available in which they might expand and reinforce their knowledge of this topic, while contributing to new research on it, for so many students are curious about this history. 
View course details
Description
ASRC 4368 : Reading Édouard Glissant
Crosslisted as: ASRC 6368, COML 4368, COML 6368, FREN 4368, FREN 6368 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Natalie Melas
This seminar will focus on the writings of the polymorphous Martinican poet and thinker, Édouard Glissant (1928-2011).  We will attend to the historical context of French colonialism, particularly in the Caribbean, that gives his writing part of its impetus and to the anticolonial intellectuals with whom he engages (chiefly Aimé Césaire and Frantz Fanon) as well as to his major self-professed influences (William Faulkner, Saint-John Perse, Hegel) and to an array of interlocutors and fellow-travelers as well as a few dissenters. The seminar will examine the main preoccupations of Glissant's writing (world histories of dispossession and plantation slavery, creolization, Relation, opacity, flux, transversality, Caribbean landscapes as figures of thought, the All-World, etc.) but our focus will be on reading Glissant and attending carefully to the implications of his poetics and of his language for decolonial thought.
View course details
Description
ASRC 4390 : Reconstruction and the New South
Crosslisted as: AMST 4039, ASRC 6391, HIST 4390, HIST 6391 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Margaret Washington
This course focuses on the American South in the nineteenth century as it made the transition from Reconstruction to new forms of social organization and patterns of race relations. Reconstruction will be considered from a sociopolitical perspective, concentrating on the experiences of the freed people. The New South emphasis will include topics on labor relations, economic and political changes, new cultural alliances, the rise of agrarianism, and legalization of Jim Crow.
View course details
Description
ASRC 4509 : Toni Morrison's Novels
Crosslisted as: AMST 4519, ASRC 6513, ENGL 4509, ENGL 6513, FGSS 4509, FGSS 6513 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Riche Richardson
Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison received her M.A. in English at Cornell University in 1955.  To study her, in a way, is to gain a deeper understanding of how she journeyed on from her days as a student here to become one of the world's greatest writers, how she has helped to transform world literature, and  how she has  shaped  Cornell's great legacy.  In this course, we will engage in close and reflective critical readings of Toni Morrison's eleven novels.  Morrison's writing style is characterized by highly distinctive strategies in the development of narrative and in the use of language.  Furthermore, from novel to novel, she is even known for developing features such as the very first sentence with great contemplation, an approach that also demonstrates her commitment to form.  As we journey across her body of work as readers, we will examine a range of recurring themes, along with the "love trilogy" on which she focused her repertoire for several years.  The course, through a comprehensive, chronological and focused look at Morrison's body of novels, will help students who entirely lack familiarity with it to gain a strong foundation for further research and study.  By the end of the course, even students who already know Morrison's work will walk away with a deeper and more nuanced critical understanding of it.  The course will help students to reinforce their skills in reading fiction, and help them to become more astute and exacting readers of the novel as a genre.  Morrison's novels have placed her at the vanguard of the globalization of the novel itself, and she is, undisputedly, one the most famous and innovative writers in the world.  She emerged as one of the greatest and most prolific writers of the twentieth century, and her audiences have continued to be captivated by her literary genius in this millennial age.  She is one of the most revered writers within the American literary establishment and has helped to reshape it both as a critic and novelist.  Her work can help one to develop more mastery in reading the novel as a genre.  Indeed, her thinking about this area is so original and pivotal that her fiction and critical works are absolutely indispensable for all serious students and scholars in fields such as American literature.  Its impact on African American literature is equally vital.  We will focus on reading the repertoire of novels by Morrison, including The Bluest Eye, Sula (1973), Song of Solomon (1977), Tar Baby (1981), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), Paradise (1998), Love (2003),  A Mercy (2008) Home (2012), and God Bless the Child (2014).  We will screen the 1998 film adaptation of her novel Beloved, along with documentaries related to Morrison such as Gail Pellet and Bill Moyers's Toni Morrison:  A Writer's Work and Gary Deans, Alan Hall and Jana Wendt's Toni Morrison: Uncensored.
View course details
Description
ASRC 4602 : Women and Gender Issues in Africa
Crosslisted as: ASRC 6602 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
N'Dri Assie-Lumumba
There are two contrasting views of the status and role of women in Africa. One view portrays African women as controlled by men in all social institutions. Another view projects women as having a relatively favorable position in indigenous societies they were active with an identity independent of men's and no concentration of women in a private sphere while men controlled the public sphere. This course examines critical gender theories and women in historical and contemporary periods. The topics covered include: non-westernized/pre-colonial societies; the impact and legacy of colonial policies; access to education and knowledge; women in politics and the economy in local and global contexts; women's organizations; armed conflicts and peace; same gender love and evolving family values; the law and health challenges; the United Nations and World Conferences on Women: Mexico 1975, Copenhagen 1980, Nairobi 1985, Beijing 1995 and post-Beijing meetings, and the 2010 superstructure of UN Women, and Beijing +20 in 2015 with the UN Women's slogan "Empowering Women, Empowering Humanity: Picture it!"
View course details
Description
ASRC 4637 : Viewing Black Girlhood
Crosslisted as: ASRC 6637, PMA 4966, PMA 6966, SHUM 4637, SHUM 6637 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Dehanza Rogers
This seminar explores the narratives of Black girlhood in contemporary media and popular culture. This exploration will also deal with the dearth of existing narratives around Black girlhood and the complexities of their lived experiences in education, sexuality, and interaction with authority.
View course details
Description
ASRC 4721 : Peace Building in Conflict Regions: Case Studies Sub-Saharan Africa Israel Palestinian Territories
Crosslisted as: DSOC 4721, GOVT 4723, IARD 4721, JWST 4721, NES 4721, STS 4721 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Christine Leuenberger
This course focuses on issues of conflict, peace, and reconciliation in Israel and the Palestinian Territories as well as Sub-Saharan Africa. Both regions exemplify how issues ranging from nationalism and ethnocentrism to land, water and resource management, climate change and migration, as well as socio-psychological dynamics, can exacerbate conflicts. At the same time, these regions also exemplify how trans-border collaboration and regional integration, civilian peace building efforts, strategies for achieving historical justice, as well as science education and science diplomacy can become crucial tools for long-term peace-building, reconciliation and development. In this course we will work with and discuss issues of peace and conflict with policy-makers and local stakeholders involved in peace-building efforts.
View course details
Description
ASRC 4733 : The Future of Whiteness
Crosslisted as: AMST 4733, AMST 6733, ENGL 4733, ENGL 6733 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Satya Mohanty
How should anti-racist people respond to the new racialized white identities that have emerged recently in Europe and the United States?  What alternative conceptions of whiteness are available? How can we form cross-racial progressive coalitions? How should we understand the nature of our social identities and what they make possible?  This course is a wide-ranging introduction to these questions with readings drawn from social and cultural theory, as well as literature and film. Films include Get Out and I Am Not Your Negro, as well as such Hollywood classics as Imitation of Life. Texts by such writers as James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Danzy Senna and Dorothy Allison, as well as relevant anthropological and social-theoretical work (Strangers in Their Own Land, Whiteness of a Different Color) and memoirs of anti-racist activists.  A central text will be the recent book The Future of Whiteness by the Latina feminist scholar Linda Martin Alcoff.
View course details
Description
ASRC 4900 : Honors Thesis
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Carole Boyce Davies
N'Dri Assie-Lumumba
Salah Hassan
Grant Farred
Riche Richardson
Gerard Aching
Noliwe Rooks
Judith Byfield
Olufemi Taiwo
Siba Grovogui
For senior Africana Studies majors working on honors theses, with selected reading, research projects, etc., under the supervision of a member of the Africana Studies and Research Center faculty.
View course details
Description
ASRC 4901 : Honors Thesis
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Locksley Edmondson
Carole Boyce Davies
N'Dri Assie-Lumumba
Salah Hassan
Grant Farred
Riche Richardson
Judith Byfield
Gerard Aching
Noliwe Rooks
Oneka LaBennett
Olufemi Taiwo
Siba Grovogui
For senior Africana Studies majors working on honors theses, with selected reading, research projects, etc., under the supervision of a member of the Africana Studies and Research Center faculty.
View course details
Description
ASRC 4902 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Judith Byfield
Oneka LaBennett
Carole Boyce Davies
N'Dri Assie-Lumumba
Salah Hassan
Grant Farred
Riche Richardson
Adeolu Ademoyo
Gerard Aching
Noliwe Rooks
Happiness Bulugu
For students working on special topics, with selected reading, research projects, etc., under the supervision of a member of the Africana Studies and Research Center faculty.
View course details
Description
ASRC 4903 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Locksley Edmondson
Carole Boyce Davies
N'Dri Assie-Lumumba
Salah Hassan
Grant Farred
Riche Richardson
Judith Byfield
Siba Grovogui
Adeolu Ademoyo
Gerard Aching
Noliwe Rooks
Happiness Bulugu
Oneka LaBennett
Olufemi Taiwo
Samantha Sheppard
For students working on special topics, with selected reading, research projects, etc., under the supervision of a member of the Africana Studies and Research Center faculty.
View course details
Description
ASRC 6115 : The Willard Straight Takeover & the Legacy of Black Students
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4115 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Riche Richardson
Description
ASRC 6132 : Mobility, Circulation, Migration, Diaspora: Global Connections
Crosslisted as: HIST 6132 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Ernesto Bassi Arevalo
This graduate seminar seeks to familiarize students with some of the most recent takes on transnational history that have emphasized the experiences of individuals and groups whose lives were affected by mobility across political boundaries. An explicit aim of the seminar is to use these border-crossing lives as a way to develop a critique of conventional areas studies frameworks and to explore the possibilities of imagining (geographically and otherwise) a different world (or multiple different ways of organizing global space). Since most of the readings will concentrate on the pre-nineteenth century world, the seminar will also offer students tools to rethink conventional narratives of the rise of a globalized world that tend to emphasize the second half of the nineteenth century as the birth of the global world. Globalization, this course will demonstrate, was happening long before most accepted narratives assert.
View course details
Description
ASRC 6207 : Black Feminist Theories: Sexuality, Creativity, and Power
Crosslisted as: COML 6465, ENGL 6207, FGSS 6207 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Carole Boyce Davies
This course examines black feminist theories as they are articulated in the cross-cultural experiences of women across the African Diaspora. We will explore a variety of theories, texts and creative encounters within their socio-political and geographical frames and locations, analyzing these against, or in relation to, a range of feminist activisms and movements. Some key categories of discussion will include Black Left Feminism, Feminist Movements in Latin America and the Caribbean and African feminisms. Texts like the Combahee River Collective statement and a variety of US Black feminist positions and the related literature as well as earlier black feminist articulations such as the Sojourners for Truth and Justice will also be engaged. Students will have the opportunity to develop their own research projects from a range of possibilities.
View course details
Description
ASRC 6212 : Michel Foucault: Sovereignty to BioPolitics
Crosslisted as: ENGL 6912, GOVT 6215 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Grant Farred
This course will explore the ways in which Michel Foucault's oeuvre transitions from a concern with sovereignty to a preoccupation with biopolitics. Foucault's early work (one understands that there is no absolute Foucaultian division into "sovereignty" and "biopolitics"), such as "Madness and Civilization," attends to the structure, the construction and the force of the institution -- the birth of asylum, the prison, while his later career takes up the question of, for want of a better term, "political efficiency." That is, Foucault offers a critique of sovereignty insofar as sovereignty is inefficient (neither the sovereign nor sovereign power can be everywhere; certainly not everywhere it needs or wants to be; ubiquity is impossible, even/especially for a project such as sovereignty) while biopower is not. Biopower marks this recognition; in place of sovereignty biopower "devolves" to the individual subject the right, always an intensely political phenomenon, to make decisions about everyday decisions -- decisions about health, sexuality, "lifestyle." In tracing the foucaultian trajectory from sovereignty to biopower we will read the major foucaultian texts -- "Madness and Civilization," "Birth of the Prison," "History of Sexuality" as well as the various seminars where Foucault works out important issues.
View course details
Description
ASRC 6321 : Black Power Movement and Transnationalism
Crosslisted as: AMST 6321, HIST 6321 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Russell Rickford
This seminar explores the international and transnational dimensions of the Black Power Movement, broadly defined. Beginning with an examination of transnationalism in the early 20th century, it examines the thought and political activities of African-American intellectuals and activists who crossed national boundaries, figuratively and literally, in the quest for black freedom. We will focus on the postwar era, particularly the 1950s through the 1980s, exploring transnationalism in the context of black feminism, Marxism, black nationalism, Pan Africanism, and other political traditions. We will examine the meeting and mingling of transnational discourses, ideologies, and activists in North America, the Caribbean, and Africa. 
View course details
Description
ASRC 6368 : Reading Édouard Glissant
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4368, COML 4368, COML 6368, FREN 4368, FREN 6368 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Natalie Melas
This seminar will focus on the writings of the polymorphous Martinican poet and thinker, Édouard Glissant (1928-2011).  We will attend to the historical context of French colonialism, particularly in the Caribbean, that gives his writing part of its impetus and to the anticolonial intellectuals with whom he engages (chiefly Aimé Césaire and Frantz Fanon) as well as to his major self-professed influences (William Faulkner, Saint-John Perse, Hegel) and to an array of interlocutors and fellow-travelers as well as a few dissenters. The seminar will examine the main preoccupations of Glissant's writing (world histories of dispossession and plantation slavery, creolization, Relation, opacity, flux, transversality, Caribbean landscapes as figures of thought, the All-World, etc.) but our focus will be on reading Glissant and attending carefully to the implications of his poetics and of his language for decolonial thought. 
View course details
Description
ASRC 6391 : Reconstruction and the New South
Crosslisted as: AMST 4039, ASRC 4390, HIST 4390, HIST 6391 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Margaret Washington
This course focuses on the American South in the nineteenth century as it made the transition from Reconstruction to new forms of social organization and patterns of race relations. Reconstruction will be considered from a sociopolitical perspective, concentrating on the experiences of the freed people. The New South emphasis will include topics on labor relations, economic and political changes, new cultural alliances, the rise of agrarianism, and legalization of Jim Crow.
View course details
Description
ASRC 6513 : Toni Morrison's Novels
Crosslisted as: AMST 4519, ASRC 4509, ENGL 4509, ENGL 6513, FGSS 4509, FGSS 6513 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Riche Richardson
Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison received her M.A. in English at Cornell University in 1955.  To study her, in a way, is to gain a deeper understanding of how she journeyed on from her days as a student here to become one of the world's greatest writers, how she has helped to transform world literature, and  how she has  shaped  Cornell's great legacy.  In this course, we will engage in close and reflective critical readings of Toni Morrison's eleven novels.  Morrison's writing style is characterized by highly distinctive strategies in the development of narrative and in the use of language.  Furthermore, from novel to novel, she is even known for developing features such as the very first sentence with great contemplation, an approach that also demonstrates her commitment to form.  As we journey across her body of work as readers, we will examine a range of recurring themes, along with the "love trilogy" on which she focused her repertoire for several years.  The course, through a comprehensive, chronological and focused look at Morrison's body of novels, will help students who entirely lack familiarity with it to gain a strong foundation for further research and study.  By the end of the course, even students who already know Morrison's work will walk away with a deeper and more nuanced critical understanding of it.  The course will help students to reinforce their skills in reading fiction, and help them to become more astute and exacting readers of the novel as a genre.  Morrison's novels have placed her at the vanguard of the globalization of the novel itself, and she is, undisputedly, one the most famous and innovative writers in the world.  She emerged as one of the greatest and most prolific writers of the twentieth century, and her audiences have continued to be captivated by her literary genius in this millennial age.  She is one of the most revered writers within the American literary establishment and has helped to reshape it both as a critic and novelist.  Her work can help one to develop more mastery in reading the novel as a genre.  Indeed, her thinking about this area is so original and pivotal that her fiction and critical works are absolutely indispensable for all serious students and scholars in fields such as American literature.  Its impact on African American literature is equally vital.  We will focus on reading the repertoire of novels by Morrison, including The Bluest Eye, Sula (1973), Song of Solomon (1977), Tar Baby (1981), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), Paradise (1998), Love (2003),  A Mercy (2008) Home (2012), and God Bless the Child (2014).  We will screen the 1998 film adaptation of her novel Beloved, along with documentaries related to Morrison such as Gail Pellet and Bill Moyers's Toni Morrison:  A Writer's Work and Gary Deans, Alan Hall and Jana Wendt's Toni Morrison: Uncensored.
View course details
Description
ASRC 6525 : Conscription in Three Figures: Fredric Jameson, Machiavelli and CLR James
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Grant Farred
Using Jameson's 2015 essay, "An American Utopia," as its point of departure, this course takes up the relation amongst conscription, democracy and politics. In their work, Jameson ("Utopia"), Machiavelli ("The Prince") and James ("World Revolution"), each proposes a distinct thinking of this series of relations. These three texts, as well as work by Alain Badiou, will be read to attend specifically to a critique of democracy – a question in which political failure plays a significant role.
View course details
Description
ASRC 6600 : Education and Development in Africa
Crosslisted as: EDUC 5020 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
N'Dri Assie-Lumumba
In the 1950s and 1960s, the human capital theory that emphasizes the importance of formal education for achievement of full productive potential of individuals and economic growth and development of countries enjoyed a renewed popularity. African countries promoted educational expansion with the expectation that it would lead to socio-economic development. The initial euphoria, however, was followed by skepticism and then disillusion.  Education, as it was being organized, delivered, received, and utilized, began to be perceived even as a hindrance to development. The course examines the relationship between formal education and individual and national development. Different paradigms of development, including modernization and dependency theories, and Third World Forum, are discussed with an emphasis on the perceived and actual roles of education in individual and national development. The issues to be discussed include education and schooling, the role of primary, secondary, and higher education in development, the problems of employment, language, equity in access and results with a focus on gender, race, and social class. Case studies, including selected countries of the different African sub-regions, will be used for illustration.
View course details
Description
ASRC 6602 : Women and Gender Issues in Africa
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4602 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
N'Dri Assie-Lumumba
There are two contrasting views of the status and role of women in Africa. One view portrays African women as controlled by men in all social institutions. Another view projects women as having a relatively favorable position in indigenous societies they were active with an identity independent of men's and no concentration of women in a private sphere while men controlled the public sphere. This course examines critical gender theories and women in historical and contemporary periods. The topics covered include: non-westernized/pre-colonial societies; the impact and legacy of colonial policies; access to education and knowledge; women in politics and the economy in local and global contexts; women's organizations; armed conflicts and peace; same gender love and evolving family values; the law and health challenges; the United Nations and World Conferences on Women: Mexico 1975, Copenhagen 1980, Nairobi 1985, Beijing 1995 and post-Beijing meetings, and the 2010 superstructure of UN Women.
View course details
Description
ASRC 6637 : Viewing Black Girlhood
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4637, PMA 4966, PMA 6966, SHUM 4637, SHUM 6637 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Dehanza Rogers
This seminar explores the narratives of Black girlhood in contemporary media and popular culture. This exploration will also deal with the dearth of existing narratives around Black girlhood and the complexities of their lived experiences in education, sexuality, and interaction with authority.
View course details
Description
ASRC 6900 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Adeolu Ademoyo
Carole Boyce Davies
N'Dri Assie-Lumumba
Salah Hassan
Grant Farred
Riche Richardson
Judith Byfield
Gerard Aching
Noliwe Rooks
Happiness Bulugu
Independent study course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
View course details
Description
ASRC 6901 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Locksley Edmondson
Robert Harris
Carole Boyce Davies
N'Dri Assie-Lumumba
Salah Hassan
Grant Farred
Riche Richardson
Judith Byfield
Gerard Aching
Noliwe Rooks
Oneka LaBennett
Olufemi Taiwo
Samantha Sheppard
Independent study course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
View course details
Description
ASRC 6902 : Africana Studies Graduate Seminar
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Olufemi Taiwo
This class is the first in a two-part course sequence offered in the fall and spring semesters annually. In this hybrid theory and methods course, students will read historiographic, ethnographic, and sociological engagements about African-descended people throughout the Diaspora.
View course details
Description
ASRC 6903 : Africana Studies Graduate Seminar
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Gerard Aching
The seminar is coordinated and supervised by one professor but team taught by three or four faculty members per semester. Each participating faculty member is responsible for a topical segment of the course related to her or his areas of specialization or an area of interest pertaining to theory and methodology of Africana Studies.
View course details
Description
ASRC 8901 : Graduate Thesis
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Locksley Edmondson
Robert Harris
Grant Farred
Carole Boyce Davies
N'Dri Assie-Lumumba
Salah Hassan
Fouad Makki
Riche Richardson
Judith Byfield
Gerard Aching
Noliwe Rooks
Description