Current Courses

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ASRC 1120 : Wonder Women
Crosslisted as: COMM 1120, DSOC 1120 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Lori Leonard
Noliwe Rooks
Dawn Schrader
This course brings together students, faculty, and invited guests to discuss the art of leadership and the opportunities and challenges women in leadership roles have encountered in their careers and how they have managed them. The sessions will be held in North Campus faculty residences and will feature prominent women from different professions and walks of life. Potential speakers include politicians; artists; writers; scientists; women in spiritual life; and business owners and entrepreneurs. Speakers will share their stories with students in an informal way, opening up faculty-facilitated discussions about gender, leadership, accomplishment, work-life balance, and mentorship. These talks may be interspersed with or supplemented by reading and discussion of recent writing on women and leadership.            
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ASRC 1121 : Reel Africa
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Siba Grovogui
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ASRC 1201 : Elementary Arabic I
Crosslisted as: ARAB 1201, ARAB 1201, ARAB 1201, ARAB 1201 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Munther Younes
Bilal Al-Omar
This two-course sequence assumes no previous knowledge of Arabic and provides a thorough grounding in the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It starts with the alphabet and the number system and builds the four skills gradually and systematically through carefully selected and organized materials focusing on specific, concrete and familiar topics such as self identification, family, travel, food, renting an apartment, study, the weather, etc.). These topics are listed in the textbook's table of contents.  The student who successfully completes the two-course sequence will have mastered about 1000 basic words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations on a limited range of practical topics such as self-identification, family, school, work, the weather, travel, etc., 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 180 words written in Arabic script, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 50-word paragraph in Arabic.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Novice to the Intermediate Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
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ASRC 1203 : Intermediate Arabic I
Crosslisted as: ARAB 1203, ARAB 1203 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Makda Weatherspoon
In this two-course sequence learners continue to develop the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing and grammar foundation through the extensive use of graded materials on a wide variety of topics.  While more attention is given to developing native-like pronunciation and to grammatical accuracy than in ARAB 1201 and ARAB 1202, the main focus of the course will be on encouraging fluency and facility in understanding the language and communicating ideas in it.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence will have mastered over 1500 new words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations related to a wide variety of topics beyond those covered in ARAB 1201 and ARAB 1202, such as the history and geography of the Arab world, food and health, sports, economic matters, the environment, politics, the Palestine problem, etc. 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 300 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 150-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in ARAB 1202.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Intermediate Mid to the Advanced Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
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ASRC 1500 : Introduction to Africana Studies
Crosslisted as: AMST 1500, GOVT 1503 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Siba Grovogui
This course offers an introduction to the study of Africa, the U.S., the Caribbean and other diasporas.  This course will examine, through a range of disciplines, among them literature, history, politics, philosophy, the themes - including race/racism, the Middle Passage, sexuality, colonialism, and culture - that have dominated Africana Studies since its inception in the late-1960s. We will explore these issues in the attempt to understand how black lives have been shaped, in a historical sense; and, of course, the effects of these issues in the contemporary moment. This course seeks to introduce these themes, to investigate through one or more of the disciplines relevant to the question, and to provide a broad understanding of the themes so as to enable the kind of intellectual reflection critical to Africana Studies.
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ASRC 1595 : African American History From 1865
Crosslisted as: AMST 1595, HIST 1595 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Russell Rickford
Focusing on political and social history, this course surveys African-American history from Emancipation to the present. The class examines the post-Reconstruction "Nadir" of black life; the mass black insurgency against structural racism before and after World War II; and the Post-Reform Age that arose in the wake of the dismantling of legal segregation. The course will familiarize students with the basic themes of African-American life and experience and equip them to grasp concepts of political economy; class formation; and the intersection of race, class and gender.
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ASRC 1650 : Philosophy of Race
Crosslisted as: PHIL 1650 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Benjamin Yost
This course offers an introduction to the philosophy of race. It canvasses key debates in the field concerning the metaphysical status of race, the relationship between the concept of race and racism (and the nature of the latter), the first-person reality of race, and the connections and disconnections between racial, ethnic, and national identities.
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ASRC 1816 : FWS: Writing Black Life Experience and Black Lives
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Carole Boyce Davies
An examination of selected works by Zora Neale Hurston which allows the students to study this writer and simultaneously address issues of self-invention, creativity, the imagination and the writing of black lives. Framed within the genre of life writing, we will pay attention to how Hurston experienced and represented life as an African American woman in the U.S. South, the North during the Harlem Renaissance and in the African Diaspora. We will read and respond to a selection of works by Hurston in different genres – the essay, short story, folk tale, novel, life story (or autobiography). We will explore various approaches to writing through which students will work and develop writing skills in critical areas.
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ASRC 1825 : FWS: Educational Innovations in Africa and Diaspora
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
N'Dri Assie-Lumumba
This course deals with educational innovations geared to promoting equal opportunity based on gender, race and class, in Africa and the African Diaspora. After an introduction of the concepts and theories of education and innovations and the stages of innovation as planned change, the course will focus on concrete cases and different types of educational innovations. The selected case studies, in the United States, include the creation and expansion of historically black institutions with a focus on Tuskegee Institute (now Tuskegee University), Lincoln University, Spelman College, and the Westside Preparatory School in Chicago. The African cases to be studied include African languages for instruction in Nigeria, science education also in Nigeria, Ujamaa and education for self-reliance in Tanzania, classroom action research in Lesotho, Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) in African higher education with a focus on African Virtual Universities (AVU), the application of the Global Development Learning Network (GDLN) in Côte d'Ivoire, and OnLine learning at the University of in South Africa (UNISA). The role of education in the making of the Afropolitan in the 21st Century is discussed.
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ASRC 1832 : FWS: Thinking Heidegger: Reading Was Heisst Denken
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Grant Farred
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ASRC 2003 : Africa: The Continent and Its People
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
N'Dri Assie-Lumumba
An introductory interdisciplinary course focusing on Africa's geographical, ecological, social and demographic characteristics; indigenous institutions and values; multiple cultural heritage of Africanity, Islam, Western civilization, and emerging Asian/Chinese influence. Main historical developments and transition;  contemporary political, economic, social and cultural change with technological factor. Africa's ties with the United States (from trans-Atlantic slavery to the present). Its impact on the emerging world order and its contribution to world civilization will also be explored.
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ASRC 2235 : New Visions in African Cinema
Crosslisted as: COML 2235, ENGL 2935 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Naminata Diabate
This undergraduate course introduces the formal and topical innovations that African cinema has experienced since its inception in the 1960s. Sections will explore, among others, Nollywood, sci-fi, and ideological cinema. Films include: Abderrahmane Sissako's Bamako, Mohamed Camara's Dakan, Djibril Diop Mambéty's Touki-Bouki, Cheikh Oumar Sissoko's Finzan, Anne-Laure Folly's Women with Open Eyes, Ousmane Sembène's Camp de Thiaroye, Jean-Pierre Bekolo's Quartier Mozart.
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ASRC 2543 : In the Crossfire of Empires: Africa and World War II
Crosslisted as: HIST 2543 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Judith Byfield
World War II was one of the most transformative periods in the history of the 20th century. As a result, scholars, writers and filmmakers continue to re-examine the war from multiple angles. Nonetheless, most accounts of the war marginalize Africa's role and the consequences of the war for African communities.   This course considers the new historiography on World War II that aims to put the 'world' back into our analysis of WW II and considers the ways in which imperialism, race and gender shaped the prosecution and the consequences of the war.  It focuses specifically on Africa's social, economic and political engagement with the powers at the center of the conflict and introduces students to emerging debates in African historiography and the historiography of World War II. 
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ASRC 3022 : Dave Chappelle: American Comic
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Grant Farred
Using Iceberg Slim's "Pimp," Sigmund Freud's writing on humor, Richard Pryor's "Pryor Convictions" (inter alia), as well as Chappelle's own work (from his standup routines to clips from the "Chappelle Show"), this course will explore Chappelle's singularity as American comic.
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ASRC 3031 : Race and Revolution in the Americas: 1776-1900
Crosslisted as: AMST 3032, HIST 3031, LATA 3031 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Margaret Washington
This course will examine the "age of democratic revolutions" in the Americas from the perspective of the Black Atlantic. During this momentous era, when European monarchies were successfully challenged and constitutional governments created, Blacks fomented their own American revolutions both in the outside of evolving "New World democracies." This course examines the black trajectory in British North America, Latin America, the French (especially Haiti,) the British and the Spanish Caribbean. The course begins with black participation in the U.S. independence War (1776-1781) and concludes with black (non-U.S.) participation in the independence wars against Spain. The course will also briefly address post-emancipation race relations in these American countries. 
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ASRC 3100 : Advanced Arabic I
Crosslisted as: ARAB 3201 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Bilal Al-Omar
In this two-semester sequence, learners will be introduced to authentic, unedited Arabic language materials ranging from short stories, and poems, to newspaper articles dealing with social,  political,  and cultural issues. Emphasis will be on developing fluency in oral expression through discussions of issues presented in the reading and listening selections. There will be more focus on the development of native-like pronunciation and accurate use of grammatical structures than in the previous four courses. A primary objective of the course is the development of the writing skill through free composition exercises in topics of interest to individual students.  This course starts where ARAB 2202 leaves off and continues the development of the four language skills and grammar foundation using 18 themes, some new and some introduced in previous courses but are presented here at a more challenging level.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence have mastered over 3000 new words and will be able, within context of the 18 new and recycled themes to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations, 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, authentic, unedited passages of up to 400 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 300-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in ARAB 2202.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Advanced Mid to the Superior level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
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ASRC 3206 : Black Women and Political Leadership
Crosslisted as: ASRC 6326, ENGL 3606, FGSS 3206 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Carole Boyce Davies
This course studies the life experiences and political struggles of black women who have attained political leadership. It will study their rise to political power through an examination of the autobiographies of women from the Caribbean, the U.S., Africa and Brazil. Political figures such as Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Shirley Chisholm, Benedita da Silva will serve as some of the primary sources of analysis and discussion. Students will have the opportunity to select and follow a political leader and her challenges closely. The first half of the course will examine some of the general literature on the subject; the second half will study the women in their own words. We will attempt to have some available local political leaders visit the class.
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ASRC 3310 : Afro-Asia: Futurism and Feminisms
Crosslisted as: AAS 3312, ASRC 6610, COML 3310, FGSS 3310, LGBT 3310 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Tao Goffe
This course explores cultural representations of Afro-Asian intimacies and coalition in novels, songs, films, paintings, and poems. What affinities, loves and thefts, and tensions are present in cultural forms such as anime, jazz, kung fu, and K-pop? Students will consider the intersections and overlap between African and Asian diasporic cultures in global cities such as New York, Chicago, Havana, Lahore, Kingston, and Hong Kong to ask the question: when did Africa and Asia first encounter each other? This will be contextualized through a political and historical lens of the formation of a proto-Global South in the early twentieth, Afro-futurism, women of color feminisms, and Third World solidarity and internationalism. Tackling issues of race, gender, sexuality, and resistance, this seminar also reckons with the intertwined legacies of the institutions of African enslavement and Asian indenture by reading the novels of Patricia Powell and the paintings of Kehinde Wiley, for instance. Students will work in groups to produce Afro-Asia DJ visual soundtracks as part of the final project.
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ASRC 3353 : African Politics
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3353 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Nicolas van de Walle
This is an introductory course on the politics of Sub-Saharan Africa. The goal is to provide students with historical background and theoretical tools to understand present-day politics on the continent. The first part of the course will survey African political history, touching on: pre-colonial political structures, colonial experiences and legacies, nationalism and independence movements, post-independence optimism and state-building, the authoritarian turn, economic crises, and recent political and economic liberalizations. The second part of the course will examine some contemporary political and economic issues. These include: the effects of political and social identities in Africa (ethnicity, social ties, class, citizenship); the politics of poverty, war, and dysfunction; Africa in the international system; and current attempts to strengthen democracy and rule of law on the continent.
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ASRC 3550 : Modeling Race, Fashioning Beauty
Crosslisted as: AMST 3560, FGSS 3540 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Noliwe Rooks
This course explores written and visual biographies of African American and African women in the fashion industry as a launching point for thinking about beauty, race, gender and class. Some of the questions that will be explored during the semester are: How do ethnicity and femininity intersect? How are authenticity and difference commodified? How do women construct identities through narrative or craft themselves through body modification? How do women negotiate their relationships to their bodies, families and nations? Contemporary television programs, global fashion and cultural studies will also be discussed. Students will write self-narratives about their relationships with cultural standards of beauty.
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ASRC 3612 : Pan-African Drum and Dance Ensemble
Crosslisted as: MUSIC 3612, PMA 3212 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Isaac Anim
Catherine Appert
Pan-African Drum and Dance Ensemble is an introductory performance course where students learn performance traditions from across West Africa. No prior experience is necessary. Students may choose to focus on drumming or dancing.
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ASRC 3742 : Africans and African Americans in Literature
Crosslisted as: AMST 3732, ENGL 3742 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Mukoma Ngugi
When an African and an African American meet, solidarity is presumed, but often friction is the result. In this course, we will consider how Africans and African Americans see each other through literature. What happens when two peoples suffering from double consciousness meet? We will examine the influence of historical forces including slavery, colonialism and pan-Africanism on the way writers explore the meeting between Africans and African Americans. Specifically we will look at how writers such as W.E.B DuBois, Maya Angelou, NoViolet Bulawayo, Chimamanda Adichie, Richard Wright, Eugene Robinson, Philippe Wamba, Teju Cole, and Malcolm X have understood the meeting.
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ASRC 4509 : Toni Morrison's Novels
Crosslisted as: AMST 4519, ASRC 6513, ENGL 4509, ENGL 6513, FGSS 4509, FGSS 6513, AMST 4519, ASRC 6513, ENGL 4509, ENGL 6513, FGSS 4509, FGSS 6513 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Riche Richardson
Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison received her M.A. in English at Cornell University in 1955.  To study her, in a way, is to gain a deeper understanding of how she journeyed on from her days as a student here to become one of the world's greatest writers, how she has helped to transform world literature, and  how she has  shaped  Cornell's great legacy.  In this course, we will engage in close and reflective critical readings of Toni Morrison's eleven novels.  Morrison's writing style is characterized by highly distinctive strategies in the development of narrative and in the use of language.  Furthermore, from novel to novel, she is even known for developing features such as the very first sentence with great contemplation, an approach that also demonstrates her commitment to form.  As we journey across her body of work as readers, we will examine a range of recurring themes, along with the "love trilogy" on which she focused her repertoire for several years.  The course, through a comprehensive, chronological and focused look at Morrison's body of novels, will help students who entirely lack familiarity with it to gain a strong foundation for further research and study.  By the end of the course, even students who already know Morrison's work will walk away with a deeper and more nuanced critical understanding of it.  The course will help students to reinforce their skills in reading fiction, and help them to become more astute and exacting readers of the novel as a genre.  Morrison's novels have placed her at the vanguard of the globalization of the novel itself, and she is, undisputedly, one the most famous and innovative writers in the world.  She emerged as one of the greatest and most prolific writers of the twentieth century, and her audiences have continued to be captivated by her literary genius in this millennial age.  She is one of the most revered writers within the American literary establishment and has helped to reshape it both as a critic and novelist.  Her work can help one to develop more mastery in reading the novel as a genre.  Indeed, her thinking about this area is so original and pivotal that her fiction and critical works are absolutely indispensable for all serious students and scholars in fields such as American literature.  Its impact on African American literature is equally vital.  We will focus on reading the repertoire of novels by Morrison, including The Bluest Eye, Sula (1973), Song of Solomon (1977), Tar Baby (1981), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), Paradise (1998), Love (2003),  A Mercy (2008) Home (2012), and God Bless the Child (2014).  We will screen the 1998 film adaptation of her novel Beloved, along with documentaries related to Morrison such as Gail Pellet and Bill Moyers's Toni Morrison:  A Writer's Work and Gary Deans, Alan Hall and Jana Wendt's Toni Morrison: Uncensored.
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ASRC 4733 : The Future of Whiteness
Crosslisted as: AMST 4733, AMST 6733, ENGL 4733, ENGL 6733 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Satya Mohanty
How should anti-racist people respond to the new racialized white identities that have emerged recently in Europe and the United States? What alternative conceptions of whiteness are available? How can we form cross-racial progressive coalitions? How should we understand the nature of our social identities and what they make possible? This course is a wide-ranging introduction to these questions with readings drawn from social and cultural theory, as well as literature and film. Films include Get Out and I Am Not Your Negro, as well as such Hollywood classics as Imitation of Life. Texts by such writers as James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Danzy Senna and Dorothy Allison, as well as relevant anthropological and social-theoretical work (Strangers in Their Own Land, Whiteness of a Different Color) and memoirs of anti-racist activists. A central text will be the recent book The Future of Whiteness by the Latina feminist scholar Linda Martin Alcoff.
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ASRC 4900 : Honors Thesis
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Carole Boyce Davies
N'Dri Assie-Lumumba
Salah Hassan
Grant Farred
Riche Richardson
Gerard Aching
Noliwe Rooks
Judith Byfield
Olufemi Taiwo
Siba Grovogui
For senior Africana Studies majors working on honors theses, with selected reading, research projects, etc., under the supervision of a member of the Africana Studies and Research Center faculty.
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ASRC 4902 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Judith Byfield
Oneka LaBennett
Carole Boyce Davies
N'Dri Assie-Lumumba
Salah Hassan
Grant Farred
Riche Richardson
Adeolu Ademoyo
Gerard Aching
Noliwe Rooks
Happiness Bulugu
For students working on special topics, with selected reading, research projects, etc., under the supervision of a member of the Africana Studies and Research Center faculty.
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ASRC 6131 : A Greater Caribbean: New Approaches to Caribbean History
Crosslisted as: HIST 6131, LATA 6131 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Ernesto Bassi Arevalo
Description
ASRC 6326 : Black Women and Political Leadership
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3206, ENGL 3606, FGSS 3206 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Carole Boyce Davies
Description
ASRC 6513 : Toni Morrison's Novels
Crosslisted as: AMST 4519, ASRC 4509, ENGL 4509, ENGL 6513, FGSS 4509, FGSS 6513, AMST 4519, ASRC 4509, ENGL 4509, ENGL 6513, FGSS 4509, FGSS 6513 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Riche Richardson
Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison received her M.A. in English at Cornell University in 1955.  To study her, in a way, is to gain a deeper understanding of how she journeyed on from her days as a student here to become one of the world's greatest writers, how she has helped to transform world literature, and  how she has  shaped  Cornell's great legacy.  In this course, we will engage in close and reflective critical readings of Toni Morrison's eleven novels.  Morrison's writing style is characterized by highly distinctive strategies in the development of narrative and in the use of language.  Furthermore, from novel to novel, she is even known for developing features such as the very first sentence with great contemplation, an approach that also demonstrates her commitment to form.  As we journey across her body of work as readers, we will examine a range of recurring themes, along with the "love trilogy" on which she focused her repertoire for several years.  The course, through a comprehensive, chronological and focused look at Morrison's body of novels, will help students who entirely lack familiarity with it to gain a strong foundation for further research and study.  By the end of the course, even students who already know Morrison's work will walk away with a deeper and more nuanced critical understanding of it.  The course will help students to reinforce their skills in reading fiction, and help them to become more astute and exacting readers of the novel as a genre.  Morrison's novels have placed her at the vanguard of the globalization of the novel itself, and she is, undisputedly, one the most famous and innovative writers in the world.  She emerged as one of the greatest and most prolific writers of the twentieth century, and her audiences have continued to be captivated by her literary genius in this millennial age.  She is one of the most revered writers within the American literary establishment and has helped to reshape it both as a critic and novelist.  Her work can help one to develop more mastery in reading the novel as a genre.  Indeed, her thinking about this area is so original and pivotal that her fiction and critical works are absolutely indispensable for all serious students and scholars in fields such as American literature.  Its impact on African American literature is equally vital.  We will focus on reading the repertoire of novels by Morrison, including The Bluest Eye, Sula (1973), Song of Solomon (1977), Tar Baby (1981), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), Paradise (1998), Love (2003),  A Mercy (2008) Home (2012), and God Bless the Child (2014).  We will screen the 1998 film adaptation of her novel Beloved, along with documentaries related to Morrison such as Gail Pellet and Bill Moyers's Toni Morrison:  A Writer's Work and Gary Deans, Alan Hall and Jana Wendt's Toni Morrison: Uncensored.
Full details of ASRC 6513
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ASRC 6610 : Afro-Asia: Futurism and Feminisms
Crosslisted as: AAS 3312, ASRC 3310, COML 3310, FGSS 3310, LGBT 3310 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Tao Goffe
Description
ASRC 6900 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Adeolu Ademoyo
Carole Boyce Davies
N'Dri Assie-Lumumba
Salah Hassan
Grant Farred
Riche Richardson
Judith Byfield
Gerard Aching
Noliwe Rooks
Happiness Bulugu
Independent study course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ASRC 6902 : Africana Studies Graduate Seminar
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Olufemi Taiwo
This class is the first in a two-part course sequence offered in the fall and spring semesters annually. In this hybrid theory and methods course, students will read historiographic, ethnographic, and sociological engagements about African-descended people throughout the Diaspora.
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