Courses - Spring 2020

ASRC 1202 Elementary Arabic II

This two-course sequence assumes no previous knowledge of Arabic and provides a thorough grounding in the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It starts with the alphabet and the number system and builds the four skills gradually and systematically through carefully selected and organized materials focusing on specific, concrete and familiar topics such as self identification, family, travel, food, renting an apartment, study, the weather, etc.). These topics are listed in the textbook's table of contents.  The student who successfully completes the two-course sequence will have mastered about 1000 basic words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations on a limited range of practical topics such as self-identification, family, school, work, the weather, travel, etc., 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 180 words written in Arabic script, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 50-word paragraph in Arabic.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Novice to the Intermediate Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Bilal Al-Omar (bma57)
Full details for ASRC 1202 : Elementary Arabic II
ASRC 1500 Introduction to Africana Studies

This course offers an introduction to the study of Africa, the U.S., the Caribbean and other diasporas.  This course will examine, through a range of disciplines, among them literature, history, politics, philosophy, the themes - including race/racism, the Middle Passage, sexuality, colonialism, and culture - that have dominated Africana Studies since its inception in the late-1960s. We will explore these issues in the attempt to understand how black lives have been shaped, in a historical sense; and, of course, the effects of these issues in the contemporary moment. This course seeks to introduce these themes, to investigate through one or more of the disciplines relevant to the question, and to provide a broad understanding of the themes so as to enable the kind of intellectual reflection critical to Africana Studies.

Distribution: (CA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Carole Boyce Davies (ceb278)
Full details for ASRC 1500 : Introduction to Africana Studies
ASRC 1844 FWS: Whites Are Here to Stay

At the conclusion of World War II, the US ushered in a new international order based on the principles of the Atlantic Charter, which became the basis for the United Nations Charter: including but not limited to the right to self-determination and global economic cooperation. All this changed when Henry Kissinger proclaimed that "The whites are (in Africa) to stay and the only way that constructive change can come about is through them. There is no hope for the blacks to gain the political rights they seek through violence, which will only lead to chaos and increased opportunities for the communists." This course examine how US Foreign policy toward Africa has been formulated and executed since the Nixon years.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Siba Grovogui (sng52)
Full details for ASRC 1844 : FWS: Whites Are Here to Stay
ASRC 1849 FWS: Race in Africa?

The dearth of trans-Saharan slave narratives should not deter us from undertaking the task of recovering the voices of the enslaved. The absence of an African body of narratives written by slaves that parallels the established American one does not entail that the source materials available to us are illegible as slave narratives. Nor should this lead us to assume that trans-Saharan slaves were silent. Through police and court records, autobiographies and works of fiction, this course will expose students to a diverse textual repository wherein trans-Saharan memories of enslavement are introduced in all their unrefined, less-personal and imagined forms. Students will also explore dominant themes and identify affinities and disparities between both American and trans-Saharan slaveries.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Afifa Ltifi (al2384)
Full details for ASRC 1849 : FWS: Race in Africa?
ASRC 1850 FWS: The Grammar of the African Diaspora: Writing Through the Black Mediterranean
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Olumayowa Willoughby (oaw5)
Full details for ASRC 1850 : FWS: The Grammar of the African Diaspora: Writing Through the Black Mediterranean
ASRC 2006 Understanding Global Capitalism Through Service Learning

This course is a seminar focused on a service-learning approach to understanding the history of neoliberal transformations of the global economy through the lens of an island (Jamaica) and a community (Petersfield.) Building on the success of previous year's global service-learning course and trip to Petersfield, and now bringing the course under the auspices of both the Engaged Cornell and Cornell Abroad administrative and funding capabilities. Students will attend class each week and will also take a one-week service trip over spring break to work with the local community partner (AOC) in Petersfield. We will also work with Amizade, a non-profit based in Pittsburgh, who is the well-established partner of the AOC and which works with numerous universities on global service learning projects. They have a close relationship with CU Engaged Learning.

Distribution: (HA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Edward Baptist (eeb36)
Full details for ASRC 2006 : Understanding Global Capitalism Through Service Learning
ASRC 2200 Intermediate Arabic II

In this two-course sequence learners continue to develop the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing and grammar foundation through the extensive use of graded materials on a wide variety of topics.  While more attention is given to developing native-like pronunciation and to grammatical accuracy than in ARAB 1201 and ARAB 1202, the main focus of the course will be on encouraging fluency and facility in understanding the language and communicating ideas in it.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence will have mastered over 1500 new words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations related to a wide variety of topics beyond those covered in ARAB 1201 and ARAB 1202, such as the history and geography of the Arab world, food and health, sports, economic matters, the environment, politics, the Palestine problem, etc. 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 300 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 150-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in ARAB 1202.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Intermediate Mid to the Advanced Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.

Distribution: (CA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Makda Weatherspoon (mgw49)
Full details for ASRC 2200 : Intermediate Arabic II
ASRC 2204 Introduction to Quranic Arabic

This course is designed for students who are interested in reading the language of the Qur'an with accuracy and understanding. The first week (4 classes) will be devoted to an introduction of the history of the Qur'an: the revelation, collection, variant readings, and establishment of an authoritative edition. The last week will be devoted to a general overview of "revisionist" literature on the Qur'an. In the remaining 12 weeks, we will cover all of Part 30 (Juz' 'Amma, suuras 78-114) and three suuras of varying length (36, 19, and 12).

Distribution: (LA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Munther Younes (may2)
Full details for ASRC 2204 : Introduction to Quranic Arabic
ASRC 2308 Modern Caribbean History

This course examines the development of the Caribbean since the Haitian Revolution.  It  will focus on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and our readings pay particular attention to the ways in which race, gender, and ethnicity shape the histories of the peoples of the region.  The course uses a pan-Caribbean approach by focusing largely on three islands - Jamaica, Haiti and Cuba - that belonged to competing empires.  Although the imperial powers that held these nations shaped their histories in distinctive ways these nations share certain common features. Therefore, we examine the differences and similarities of their histories as they evolved from plantation based colonies to independent nations.

Distribution: (HA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Judith Byfield (jab632)
Full details for ASRC 2308 : Modern Caribbean History
ASRC 2631 Race and Modern US History

This course surveys modern U.S. history, from Reconstruction to the contemporary period. It will examine how race has been the terrain on which competing ideas of the American nation have been contested. From struggles over citizenship rights to broader meanings of national belonging, we will explore how practices, ideas, and representations have shaped political, cultural, and social power. A key concern for this course is examining how groups and individuals have pursued racial justice from the late-nineteenth century to the present.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Derek Chang (dsc37)
Full details for ASRC 2631 : Race and Modern US History
ASRC 2650 Introduction to African American Literature

This course will introduce students to the African American literary tradition. Through aesthetic and contextual approaches, we will consider how African American life and culture has defined and constituted the United States of America. From slave narratives to Hip-Hop music, we will trace the range of artistic conventions and cultural movements while paying close attention to broader historical shifts in American life over the past three centuries. We will ask: How do authors create and define a tradition? What are some of the recurring themes and motifs within this tradition? Authors will include: David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, W.E.B. DuBois, Zora Neale Hurston, Lorraine Hansberry, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Claudia Rankine, and Chimamanda Adichie.

Distribution: (CA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Derrick Spires (drs385)
Full details for ASRC 2650 : Introduction to African American Literature
ASRC 2870 Freedom Writes: Literature of Global Justice Struggles

This course examines some major justice movements of the modern era, introducing students to a submerged history that should neither be idealized nor forgotten. One goal will be to connect the ongoing struggles for social justice of minoritized populations in the US with the history of struggles for justice by workers, women, and disempowered social groups across the world. We'll begin with the work of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and Gandhi, and conclude with a look at contemporary activist movements.  Along the way, we'll look at such cultural forms as AIDS quilts, urban murals, the music of Bob Marley, and theatrical productions from prisons, as well as Anna Deveare Smith's Twilight L.A. and Helena Viramontes' novel Under the Feet of Jesus.

Distribution: (LA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Mary Pat Brady (mpb23)
Helena Viramontes (hmv2)
Full details for ASRC 2870 : Freedom Writes: Literature of Global Justice Struggles
ASRC 3101 Advanced Arabic II

In this two-semester sequence, learners will be introduced to authentic, unedited Arabic language materials ranging from short stories, and poems, to newspaper articles dealing with social,  political,  and cultural issues. Emphasis will be on developing fluency in oral expression through discussions of issues presented in the reading and listening selections. There will be more focus on the development of native-like pronunciation and accurate use of grammatical structures than in the previous four courses. A primary objective of the course is the development of the writing skill through free composition exercises in topics of interest to individual students.  This course starts where ARAB 2202 leaves off and continues the development of the four language skills and grammar foundation using 18 themes, some new and some introduced in previous courses but are presented here at a more challenging level.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence have mastered over 3000 new words and will be able, within context of the 18 new and recycled themes to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations, 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, authentic, unedited passages of up to 400 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 300-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in ARAB 2202.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Advanced Mid to the Superior level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.

Distribution: (CA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Bilal Al-Omar (bma57)
Full details for ASRC 3101 : Advanced Arabic II
ASRC 3330 China-Africa Relations

Put into questions, the aims of this course are as follow: Should anyone worry about China's presence in Africa? Is China's presence part of the recolonizing of the Continent? Alternatively, is China's foray part of a global struggle for positioning between an emergent China and Africa's so-called traditional allies in the West?

Distribution: (SBA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Siba Grovogui (sng52)
Full details for ASRC 3330 : China-Africa Relations
ASRC 3340 Race, Class, Gender and Violence

Ideas change the world. Sometimes the same ideas can do tremendous good and also cause great suffering. In this course we will consider violence and revolutionary changes through the prism of British 17th and 18th century Enlightenment thought. Thinking through the writings of Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, Mary Wollstonecraft and others, we will explore the ways in which the brilliance and blind spots of Enlightenment thinking influenced contemporary notions of race, class, gender and changed the world. The class counts toward the pre-1800 requirement for English majors.

Distribution: (LA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Satya Mohanty (spm5)
Mukoma Ngugi (mwn39)
Full details for ASRC 3340 : Race, Class, Gender and Violence
ASRC 3434 Underground Railroad Seminar: Grant Writing and App Building

This course offers undergraduates a unique approach to exploring the abolition movement of central New York. It is an experiential course that includes visits to specific known underground stations as well as Harriet Tuban's residence and the William H. Seward House in Auburn, NY. It is also a community-engaged course in which students will contribute research for grant writing for two sites: the St. James AME Zion Church in Ithaca and the Howland Stone Store Museum in Sherwood, NY. Readings include some of the classic slave narratives and studies of the underground railroad. Please send a brief explanation of your interest in enrolling in this course to Professor Gerard Aching [gla23@cornell.edu] 

Distribution: (CA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Gerard Aching (gla23)
Full details for ASRC 3434 : Underground Railroad Seminar: Grant Writing and App Building
ASRC 3590 The Black Radical Tradition in the U.S.

This course provides a critical historical interrogation of what Black Marxism author Cedric Robinson called "the Black Radical Tradition." It will introduce students to some of the major currents in the history of black radical thought, action, and organizing, with an emphasis on the United States after World War I. It relies on social, political, and intellectual history to examine the efforts of black people who have sought not merely social reform, but a fundamental restructuring of political, economic, and social relations. We will define and evaluate radicalism in the shifting contexts of liberation struggles. We will explore dissenting visions of social organization and alternative definitions of citizenship, progress, and freedom. We will confront the meaning of the intersection of race, gender, class, and sexuality in social movements.

Distribution: (HA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Russell Rickford (rr447)
Full details for ASRC 3590 : The Black Radical Tradition in the U.S.
ASRC 3612 Pan-African Drum and Dance Ensemble

Pan-African Drum and Dance Ensemble is an introductory performance course where students learn performance traditions from across West Africa. No prior experience is necessary. Students may choose to focus on drumming or dancing.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Isaac Anim (ika6)
Full details for ASRC 3612 : Pan-African Drum and Dance Ensemble
ASRC 4291 Marriage and Divorce in the African Context

Marriage was the widely expected norm within African societies. The institution was an important marker of adulthood, linking individuals and lineages in a network of mutual cooperation and support. Marriage practices and the concomitant gender expectations varied significantly between societies, and over time. As a result, marriage and divorce are especially rich terrain for exploring social history, women's agency, discursive constructions of 'women', masculinity and gender relations of power. This course explores some of the newest scholarship on marriage by Africanist scholars. The readings demonstrate the wide cultural variety in marriage as well as the dynamic relationship between marriage and historical change. They especially highlight women's roles and expectations in marriage, masculinity and the ways men and women negotiated the rules and boundaries of marriage. 

Distribution: (HA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Judith Byfield (jab632)
Full details for ASRC 4291 : Marriage and Divorce in the African Context
ASRC 4390 Reconstruction and the New South

This course focuses on the American South in the nineteenth century as it made the transition from Reconstruction to new forms of social organization and patterns of race relations. Reconstruction will be considered from a sociopolitical perspective, concentrating on the experiences of the freed people. The New South emphasis will include topics on labor relations, economic and political changes, new cultural alliances, the rise of agrarianism, and legalization of Jim Crow.

Distribution: (HA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Margaret Washington (mw26)
Full details for ASRC 4390 : Reconstruction and the New South
ASRC 4672 Nationalism(s) in the Arab World

This seminar examines the emergence of national identities, nationalist movements, and nation-states in the modern Arab world. First, we will examine various approaches to the question of nationalism, using Benedict Anderson's Imagined Communities as our basic reference. We will then test the applicability of these general theories to the Arab World through our examination of specific case studies.

Distribution: (HA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Ziad Fahmy (zaf3)
Full details for ASRC 4672 : Nationalism(s) in the Arab World
ASRC 4721 Peace Building in Conflict Regions: Case Studies Sub-Saharan Africa Israel Palestinian Territories

This course focuses on issues of conflict, peace, and reconciliation in Israel and the Palestinian Territories as well as Sub-Saharan Africa. Both regions exemplify how issues ranging from nationalism and ethnocentrism to land, water and resource management, climate change and migration, as well as socio-psychological dynamics, can exacerbate conflicts. At the same time, these regions also exemplify how trans-border collaboration and regional integration, civilian peace building efforts, strategies for achieving historical justice, as well as science education and science diplomacy can become crucial tools for long-term peace-building, reconciliation and development. In this course we will work with and discuss issues of peace and conflict with policy-makers and local stakeholders involved in peace-building efforts.

Distribution: (CA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Christine Leuenberger (cal22)
Full details for ASRC 4721 : Peace Building in Conflict Regions: Case Studies Sub-Saharan Africa Israel Palestinian Territories
ASRC 4901 Honors Thesis

For senior Africana Studies majors working on honors theses, with selected reading, research projects, etc., under the supervision of a member of the Africana Studies and Research Center faculty.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Locksley Edmondson (le18)
Full details for ASRC 4901 : Honors Thesis
ASRC 4903 Independent Study

For students working on special topics, with selected reading, research projects, etc., under the supervision of a member of the Africana Studies and Research Center faculty.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Locksley Edmondson (le18)
Full details for ASRC 4903 : Independent Study
ASRC 4995 Body Politics in African Literature and Cinema

The course examines how postcolonial African writers and filmmakers engage with and revise controversial images of bodies and sexuality--genital cursing, same-sex desire, HIV/AIDS, genital surgeries, etc. Our inquiry also surveys African theorists' troubling of problematic tropes and practices such as the conception in 19th-century racist writings of the colonized as embodiment, the pathologization and hypersexualization of colonized bodies, and the precarious and yet empowering nature of the body and sexuality in the postcolonial African experience. As we focus on African artists and theorists, we also read American and European theorists, including but not certainly limited to Giorgio Agamben, Michel Foucault, Roland Barthes, and Joseph Slaughter, detecting the ways in which discourses around bodies in the African context may shape contemporary theories and vice versa.

Distribution: (CA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Naminata Diabate (nd326)
Full details for ASRC 4995 : Body Politics in African Literature and Cinema
ASRC 6020 Pretty Politics: The Aesthetics of Race and Gender
Academic Career: GR Instructor: Noliwe Rooks (nmr67)
Full details for ASRC 6020 : Pretty Politics: The Aesthetics of Race and Gender
ASRC 6322 Readings in 20th Century African-American History

This graduate seminar will explore major currents in historical writing about African-American life and culture in the twentieth century. Focusing on social, intellectual, and labor history, we will identify key themes in recent studies of the formation of modern black communities and politics before and after World War Two. The course will place special emphasis on class, gender, social movements, and migration.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Russell Rickford (rr447)
Full details for ASRC 6322 : Readings in 20th Century African-American History
ASRC 6391 Reconstruction and the New South

This course focuses on the American South in the nineteenth century as it made the transition from Reconstruction to new forms of social organization and patterns of race relations. Reconstruction will be considered from a sociopolitical perspective, concentrating on the experiences of the freed people. The New South emphasis will include topics on labor relations, economic and political changes, new cultural alliances, the rise of agrarianism, and legalization of Jim Crow.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Margaret Washington (mw26)
Full details for ASRC 6391 : Reconstruction and the New South
ASRC 6511 The African Diaspora: Theories and Texts
Academic Career: GR Instructor: Carole Boyce Davies (ceb278)
Full details for ASRC 6511 : The African Diaspora: Theories and Texts
ASRC 6525 Conscription in Three Figures: Fredric Jameson, Machiavelli and CLR James

Using Jameson's 2015 essay, "An American Utopia," as its point of departure, this course takes up the relation amongst conscription, democracy and politics. In their work, Jameson ("Utopia"), Machiavelli ("The Prince") and James ("World Revolution"), each proposes a distinct thinking of this series of relations. These three texts, as well as work by Alain Badiou, will be read to attend specifically to a critique of democracy – a question in which political failure plays a significant role.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Grant Farred (gaf38)
Full details for ASRC 6525 : Conscription in Three Figures: Fredric Jameson, Machiavelli and CLR James
ASRC 6901 Independent Study

Independent study course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Locksley Edmondson (le18)
Full details for ASRC 6901 : Independent Study
ASRC 6903 Africana Studies Graduate Seminar

The seminar is coordinated and supervised by one professor but team taught by three or four faculty members per semester. Each participating faculty member is responsible for a topical segment of the course related to her or his areas of specialization or an area of interest pertaining to theory and methodology of Africana Studies.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Gerard Aching (gla23)
Full details for ASRC 6903 : Africana Studies Graduate Seminar
SWAHL 1101 Elementary Swahili II

Elementary Swahili provides a foundation in listening, speaking, reading, and writing the basic grammatical structures and vocabulary. No prior knowledge of the language is required. Swahili (Kiswahili) is spoken in the East and Central parts of Africa. It is an official and national language in Tanzania, and in Kenya. During a first semester course, students engage in short conversation and communicative tasks, such as, greetings, introduction, daily routines, shopping, etc. Students learn to comprehend short and simple utterances about topics pertaining to basic personal information and immediate setting in day to day life. A Swahili second semester increases your oral fluency, grammar, vocabulary, writing, reading, and listening skills. All listening exercises will aim at preparing students to speak. Be ready to actively participate in conversations, to express yourself orally, and write stories/compositions. Literature and Cultural materials are incorporated into the course, along with audio, video, and web-based materials.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Happiness Bulugu (hpb36)
Full details for SWAHL 1101 : Elementary Swahili II
SWAHL 1107 Elementary Swahili for Global Health

This course is intended for students whom will be spending the summer in Tanzania for the Global Health Program.  To prepare students to live and learn in Tanzania, this course will provide an introduction to and foundation in basic Kiswahili.  Students will develop the capacity to communicate with Tanzanian peers and homestay families, as well as develop the competency to navigate community life in Tanzania. Since this is a one credit seminar, this course does NOT fulfill a language requirement for colleges or majors.This course is intended for students whom will be spending the summer in Tanzania for the Global Health Program.  To prepare students to live and learn in Tanzania, this course will provide an introduction to and foundation in basic Kiswahili.  Students will develop the capacity to communicate with Tanzanian peers and homestay families, as well as develop the competency to navigate community life in Tanzania. Since this is a one credit seminar, this course does NOT fulfill a language requirement for colleges or majors.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Happiness Bulugu (hpb36)
Full details for SWAHL 1107 : Elementary Swahili for Global Health
SWAHL 2102 Intermediate Swahili II

Intermediate Swahili levels I and II in general impart speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills beyond Swahili elementary level to participate with ease and confidence in familiar topics and exchange information on unfamiliar topics. Students are assigned communicative tasks such as respond to a situation with a short text and take part in a discussion after viewing short video clips and prompts to elicit speaking and listening competence and cultural awareness responses beyond elementary level. The language and cultural scenarios practiced are designed to help students demonstrate language responses beyond familiar topics, and to feel comfortable conversing with Swahili native speakers, as well as to blend in and feel welcomed as part of the community while exploring different topics such as acquaintanceship, relationships, health, festivals, education, sports, housing, politics, commerce, travel, etc. Short stories are used to depict cultural aspects such as cultural expressions, proverbs, sayings, and riddles. Literature and cultural materials are incorporated into the course, along with audio-visual and web-based material. In this course, students have an opportunity to participate in language conversation outside the classroom and explore the opportunities for study abroad in East Africa. Swahili Elementary I and II are prerequisite for this course. By the end of this course, students should be able to reach proficiency level Intermediate High according to the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) www.actfl.org.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Happiness Bulugu (hpb36)
Full details for SWAHL 2102 : Intermediate Swahili II
WOLOF 1118 Elementary Wolof II

Wolof is an African language. It is widely spoken in West Africa in countries such as Senegal, The Gambia and Mauritania. Wolof is the most widely spoken language in Senegal.  There are strong historical and contemporary links between the African American experiences and West Africa. Senegal and Wolof are important links in these experiences.  Wolof has some influence on some West European languages. Banana is a Wolof word and it is also an English word! Study Wolof, Know Africa and Know the world!

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Angelika Kraemer (ak2573)
Full details for WOLOF 1118 : Elementary Wolof II
WOLOF 2119 Intermediate Wolof II

The course is structured around IsiZulu Sanamuhla, a set of web-based learning materials that features Zulu-speaking students and families in South Africa.

Academic Career: UG Full details for WOLOF 2119 : Intermediate Wolof II
YORUB 1109 Introduction to Yoruba II

A two-semester beginner's course in Yoruba Language and Culture. Organized to offer Yoruba language skills and proficiency in speaking, reading, listening, writing, and translation. Focus is placed on familiar informal and formal contexts, e.g., home, school, work, family, social situations, politics, etc. Course uses Yoruba oral literature, proverbs, rhetoric, songs, popular videos, and theater, as learning tools for class comprehension. First semester focuses on conversation, speaking, and listening.  Second semester focuses on writing, translation and grammatical formation. Through the language course students gain basic background for the study of an African culture, arts, and history both in the continent and in the diaspora. Yoruba language is widely spoken along the west coast of Africa and in some African communities in diaspora.  Yoruba video culture, theater, music, and arts has a strong influence along the west coast and in the diaspora.A two-semester beginner's course in Yoruba language and culture. Organized to offer Yoruba language skills and proficiency in speaking, reading, listening, writing, and translation. Focus is placed on familiar informal and formal contexts, e.g., home, school, work, family, social situations, politics. Course uses Yoruba oral literature, proverbs, rhetoric, songs, popular videos, and theater as learning tools for class comprehension. First semester focuses on conversation, speaking, and listening. Second semester focuses on writing, translation, and grammatical formation. Through the language course students gain basic background for the study of an African culture, arts, and history both on the continent and in the diaspora. Yoruba language is widely spoken along the west coast of Africa and in some African communities in diaspora. Yoruba video culture, theater, music, and arts have strong influence along the west coast and in the diaspora.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Adeolu Ademoyo (aaa54)
Full details for YORUB 1109 : Introduction to Yoruba II
YORUB 2111 Intermediate Yoruba II

Intermediate Yoruba II is a follow-up to Intermediate Yoruba I. It is a fourth-semester Yoruba language course. The course assists students to acquire advanced level proficiency in reading, speaking, writing, and listening in Yoruba language. Students are introduced to grammatical and syntactic structures in the language that will assist them in describing, presenting, and narrating information in the basic tenses. At the end of the course, students will be able to listen to, process, and understand programs produced for native speakers in media such as television, radio, and films. They will be able to read and understand short stories, novels, and plays written for native speakers of the language.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Adeolu Ademoyo (aaa54)
Full details for YORUB 2111 : Intermediate Yoruba II
YORUB 3111 Advanced Yoruba II

This course will help students expand their understanding of the Yoruba language through the communicative approach. We will focus on the four skills, speaking, listening, learning, and writing.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Adeolu Ademoyo (aaa54)
Full details for YORUB 3111 : Advanced Yoruba II
ZULU 1116 Elementary Zulu II

IsiZulu is the most widely spoken language in the Southern African region and it is an official language of South Africa. This two-semester beginners' course emphasizes speaking and listening, and trains students to communicate in everyday situations.  In acquiring this competence, students are introduced to the structure of the language and to the significant status of Zulu language and culture in contemporary multilingual South Africa.  The course is structured around IsiZulu Sanamuhla, a set of web-based learning materials that features Zulu-speaking students and families in South Africa.IsiZulu is the most widely spoken language in the Southern African region and it is an official language of South Africa. This two-semester beginners' course emphasizes speaking and listening, and trains students to communicate in everyday situations.  In acquiring this competence, students are introduced to the structure of the language and to the significant status of Zulu language and culture in contemporary multilingual South Africa.  The course is structured around IsiZulu Sanamuhla, a set of web-based learning materials that features Zulu-speaking students and families in South Africa.

Academic Career: UG Full details for ZULU 1116 : Elementary Zulu II
ZULU 2117 Intermediate Zulu II

The course is structured around IsiZulu Sanamuhla, a set of web-based learning materials that features Zulu-speaking students and families in South Africa.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Angelika Kraemer (ak2573)
Full details for ZULU 2117 : Intermediate Zulu II
ZULU 3114 Advanced Zulu II

The course is structured around IsiZulu Sanamuhla, a set of web-based learning materials that features Zulu-speaking students and families in South Africa.

Academic Career: UG Full details for ZULU 3114 : Advanced Zulu II